Tennessee School Improvement
Planning Process (TSIPP)

Riverside Elementary School

 

 

 

School-wide Plan

2012.01

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tennessee Department of Education

Commissioner Lana C. Seivers

April, 2010

 

Tennessee School Improvement Planning Process

(TSIPP)

Assurances

 

 

 

I certify that Riverside Elementary School has utilized the data and other requirements requested for each component.  The school will operate its programs in accordance with all of the required assurances and certifications for each program area.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I CERTIFY that the assurances referenced above have been satisfied to the best of my knowledge.

 

 

 

__________________________________________ ______________________

Signature of Principal Date Signed

 

 

 

 

Component 1a - School Profile and Collaborative Process

TEMPLATE 1.1: SIP Leadership Team Composition

In the School Improvement process, six committees exist: a leadership team and five subcommittees. Establish a subcommittee for each of the five components of the plan. The Leadership Team is composed of its chairperson, the chairperson from each of the subcommittees, and representatives from each relevant stakeholder group and major initiatives within the school. These stakeholders could include representatives from the following groups: teachers, administrators, non-certified personnel, community, parents, and students. In high schools, be sure to represent faculty from both the academic and the technical paths.

The Leadership Team provides guidance for the entire process. When you list the members of the Leadership Team, be sure to indicate who is serving as the chairperson of this team.

 

TEMPLATE 1.1: SIP Leadership Team Composition

(Rubric Indicator 1.1)

SIP Leadership Team Member Name

Leader-

ship Chair? (Y/N)

Position

Name of Subcommittee(s) (when applicable)

Kevin Eady N Principal #4 Action Plan Development
Betty Bowers N School-wide Facilitator #4 Action Plan Development

#5 Assurance

Debbie Groce Y Reading pull-out Tutor # 4 Action Plan Development

Process

Holley Howell N Special Education #4 Action Plan Development

Process

Amy Helms N Fifth Grade Teacher #4 Action Plan Development
Kristie Cheek N Fourth Grade Teacher #4 Action Plan Development
Sherry Jackson N Librarian #4 Action Plan Development Assessment, and Organizational Effectiveness
Laura Holley N Kindergarten Teacher #4 Action Plan Development Assessment, and Organizational Effectiveness
Christy Lowe N First Grade Teacher #4 Action Plan Development
Carol Andrews N Third Grade Teacher #4 Action Plan Development
Claritha Buchanan

CDeb Peterson

N Second Grade Teacher #4 Action Plan Development
JaDonna Secrest N Parent Member #4 Action Plan Development
Cathy Smith N Parent Member #4 Action Plan Development
Deb Peterson N Parent Member #4 Action Plan Development
Shirley Ledbetter N Parent Member #4 Action Plan Development
Sharon Brown N Parent Member #4 Action Plan Development
Angela Levya N Parent Member #4 Action Plan Development
Kim David N Parent Member #4 Action Plan Development

 

 

Component 1a - School Profile and Collaborative Process

TEMPLATE 1.2: Subcommittee Formation and Operation

Subcommittees should represent various grade levels within the school and relevant stakeholders. It is desirable to include stakeholders on subcommittees when possible. Stakeholders should be strategically assigned to appropriate committees based on strength, skills and knowledge.

If there are guiding initiatives within your school, be sure to place those key faculty members involved in the initiatives on the appropriate subcommittees. Subcommittees have the responsibility to monitor the development and implementation, as appropriate, of the respective component so that the subcommittee chair can communicate the progress to the SIP Leadership Team.

In completing the templates that name the members of the subcommittees, be sure to indicate each member’s position within the school or stakeholder group. Indicate which member serves as the subcommittee chair.

After each list of the members for a subcommittee, be sure to indicate the signatures for the subcommittee chairs are on file and check the box to indicate assurance the subcommittee has met and minutes are on file.

TEMPLATE 1.2: Subcommittee Formation and Operation

(Rubric Indicator 1.2)

Subcommittee for COMPONENT 1 School Profile and Collaborative Process

Member Name

Position

Chair

Kristie Cheek Fourth Grade Teacher

Y

Sally Fagan Speech/Language Therapist

Y

Peggy Sims Second Grade Teacher

N

Rita Williams Kindergarten Teacher

N

Nina Whiteside Third Grade Teacher

N

Cara Skaggs Fifth Grade Teacher

N

Amy Luna Title Reading Teacher

N

Holly Howell Special Education Teacher

N

Norma Sharp Library Assistant

N

Linda Clark Third Grade Teacher

N

Cameron Smith Student

N

Janna Stewart Parent Representative

N

Jim Derryberry Community Representative

N

Christy Lowe First Grade Teacher

N

Betty Jo Flowers Third Grade Teacher

N

(tab in last cell to create a new row as needed)Component 1 Subcommittee has met to address critical components of the SIP and minutes are on file.

 

 

YES

 

 

NO

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Subcommittee 1 Chair Signature

 

 

 

Subcommittee for COMPONENT 2 Beliefs, Mission and Vision

Member Name

Position

Chair

Catherine Secrest Fifth Grade Teacher

Y

Kathy Brock Fourth Grade Teacher

Y

Kay Oliver Second Grade Teacher

N

Jane Craft Kindergarten Teacher

N

Kevin Kennedy Physical Education Teacher

N

Pat Inman Paraprofessional

N

Mattie King First Grade Teacher

N

Cheryl Williams Music Teacher

N

Deb Peterson Parent Member

N

Jason Adrion Community Member

N

Miguel Valles Student Member

N

(tab in last cell to create a new row as needed)

Component 2 Subcommittee has met to address critical components of the SIP and minutes are on file.

YES

NO

 
Subcommittee 2 Chair Signature

 

Subcommittee for COMPONENT 3 Curricular, Instructional, Assessment, and Organizational Effectiveness

Member Name

Position

Chair

Sherry Jackson Librarian

Y

Laura Holley Kindergarten Teacher

Y

Mindy Rainey Pre-K Teacher

N

Andrea Morency First Grade Teacher

N

Shawn Armstrong First Grade Teacher

N

Donna Sears Fourth Grade Teacher

N

Barbara Condon Special Education Teacher

N

Linda Watts Second Grade Teacher

N

Shirley McGee Art Teacher

N

Gerri Lynn Jefferson Paraprofessional

N

Kim Rubio Parent Member

N

Emily Marshall Community Member

N

Bryce Symlar Student Member

N

(tab in last cell to create a new row as needed)

Component 3 Subcommittee has met to address critical components of the SIP and minutes are on file.

YES

NO

 
Subcommittee 3 Chair Signature

 

Subcommittee for COMPONENT 4 Action Plan Development

Member Name

Position

Chair

Debbie Groce Reading Tutor

Y

Ken Wiles Principal

N

Betty Bowers Facilitator

N

Laura Holley Kindergarten

N

Christy Lowe First Grade Teacher

N

Claritha Buchanan Second Grade Teacher

N

Carol Andrews Third Grade Teacher

N

Kristie Cheek Fourth Teacher

N

Amy Helms Fifth Teacher

N

Holly Howell Special Ed

N

Sherry Jackson Library

N

JaDonna Secrest Parent

N

Deb Peterson Parent

N

 

 

Shirley Ledbetter Parent

N

Sharon Brown Parent

N

Cathy Smith Parent

N

Kim David Parent

N

Angela Levya Parent

N

(tab in last cell to create a new row as needed)

Component 4 Subcommittee has met to address critical components of the SIP and minutes are on file.

YES

NO

 

Subcommittee 4 Chair Signature

 

 

Subcommittee for COMPONENT 5 The School Improvement Plan and Process Evaluation

Member Name

Position

Chair

Ken Wiles Principal

N

Betty Bowers Title I Reading Teacher

Y

Kristie Cheek Fourth Grade Teacher

N

Sally Fagan Speech and Language Teacher

N

Catherine Secrest Fifth Grade Teacher

N

Kathy Brock Fourth Grade Teacher

N

Sherry Jackson Librarian

N

Laura Holley Kindergarten Teacher

N

Debbie Groce Title I Reading Teacher

N

Carol Andrews Fifth Grade Teacher

N

Deb Peterson Parent Member

N

Mildred Grissim Community Member

N

Elizabeth Nuber Student Member

N

(tab in last cell to create a new row as needed)

Component 5 Subcommittee has met to address critical components of the SIP and minutes are on file.

YES

NO

Subcommittee 5 Chair Signature

Component 1a - School Profile and Collaborative Process

TEMPLATE 1.3 Collection of Academic and Nonacademic Data and Analysis/Synthesis

TEMPLATE 1.3.1: Data Sources (Including surveys)

Use surveys to capture perceptual data. Administer some kind of survey to all shareholders with reasonable frequency. Determine how often to administer your surveys by considering several factors:

Mobility of student families

Grade span served (if you serve only three grades, you could have a complete turnover of parents every three years)

Change in leadership

Change in organizational practice.

A school will rarely have each of the surveys listed here, but at least one survey should be administered and evaluated. Common survey types include: Title I Needs Assessment, Title I Parent Surveys, District school climate surveys. Staff Development SACS Surveys (NSSE).

TEMPLATE 1.3.1: Data Sources (including surveys)

(Rubric Indicator 1.3)

Data Source Relevant Findings
 

Parent/community Survey Spring, 2011

A parent survey was given in the spring of 2011. Parents feel that it is somewhat to very important to use technology in the classrooms and feel that we are doing ok to very well. Ninety percent (90%) of parents feel that it is very important to keep parents informed about student assessment results and 63% feel that we are doing very well with this. Most parents feel that it is somewhat to very important to provide a 90 minute uninterrupted literacy block and most feel that we do ok to very well with this. Ninety-five percent (95%) feel that using support staff to assist the classroom teacher during literacy or math block is somewhat to very important and the same feel that we are doing ok to very well with this. The majority of parents feel that is is important to engage students in guided, independent and modeled reading and writing activities and 80% feel that we are doing very well with this and 18% feel we do ok with it. Most parents feel that it is important for teachers to use TN State Standards to guide instruction and 98% feel that teachers are doing ok to very well with this. All parents feel that it is somewhat to very important for special education teachers to collaborate with regular classroom teachers with whom they work with inclusion. Thirty-three percent (33%) of parents say that we do ok with this while 60% say we do very well. All parents also feel that it is somewhat to very important for ELL teachers to supplement the regular classroom reading program by serving ELL students identified as at-risk. Forty-two percent (42%) of parents say that we do ok with this and 58% say that we do very well. The majority of parents indicated that providing additional instruction to meet the needs of at-risk students is important and they feel we are doing ok to very well with this. They also feel that providing extra tutoring either before or after school and in the summer is somewhat to very important with 48% saying that we are doing very well with this and 38% say we are doing ok. Parents like the fact that we use graphic organizers and engage students in writing activities daily and most feel that we do ok to very well with this. Eighty-four percent (84%) of parents feel that the use of accelerated math in grades 2-4 is very important and 95% feel we are doing ok to very well with this. Ninety percent (90%) of parents feel that using math manipulatives is very important and 91% of parents feel that integrating reading in the content areas is very important. The majority say that we do ok to very well implementing these. Ninety-six percent (96%) of parents say that using a pull-out tutoring program is somewhat to very important and 94% say that we are doing ok to very well with this program. Ninety-three percent (93%) of parents say it is somewhat to very important to integrate literature in the math curriculum and 95% say that we are doing ok to very well with this. Ninety-four percent (94%) of parents say that differentiating instruction is somewhat to very important and 93% feel we are doing ok to very well with this. Parents say that scheduling students to use the computer lab at least once each week is somewhat to very important and 96% say we do ok to very well with this. The majority also feel that the use of computer programs to enhance math instruction is important and they feel that we do ok to very well implementing these programs. Overall, parents were very positive about the Title I School-wide Program.

Parents were also surveyed regarding communications and school activities. Parents ranked phone calls and notes as their first choice of communications followed by classroom newsletters, menus, report cards, and progress reports and school behavior reports. Ranked as number 3 were parent/teacher conferences, agendas and/or homework folders. Of less importance to parents were Parent-School Compacts and parent workshops.

 

Faculty and staff survey, spring 2011

Forty-one Riverside faculty members were surveyed with 37 responding to the survey. However, not all responded to every question. The purpose of the survey was to get input from the faculty as to how they feel we are doing with our present school-wide plan and to help us develop a plan for the school year 2011-2012. Following is a summary of that survey:

Ninety-one percent (91%) of the faculty feels that a 90 minute block of time for reading/language arts is very important and 86% feel that this is very beneficial for students. Eighty-six percent (86%) feel that the money we have spent for literacy and math materials is very beneficial for students and 14% feel it is somewhat beneficial. Seventy-nine (79%) percent feel that staff development is very important and 20% feel it is somewhat important. Eighty-one percent (81%) of those who attended conferences and/or workshops feel they are very beneficial (this was down from 95% last year) and 63% feel that it is very beneficial for students. However, ninety-four percent (94%) of teachers feel that release time for planning and pacing is very important. Fifty percent (50%) of teachers who use the Accelerated Math program feel that it is somewhat to very beneficial for students. Eighty-eight percent (88%) of teachers feel that the technology equipment purchased this year is very beneficial to enhance reading in the content area and 12% feel it is somewhat beneficial. Ninety-one percent (91%) of teachers feel that it is very important for at-risk students to receive tutoring/small group instruction. Eighty-seven percent (87%) feel it is very beneficial for students to write everyday and 13% feel it is somewhat important. Teachers feel that extended contracts, literacy partners, guided reading, pull-out classes and team teaching is somewhat to very beneficial for at-risk students. Forty-three percent (43%) feel that inclusion is very beneficial and 50% feel it is somewhat beneficial, while 27% feel that it is not beneficial. Sixty-four percent (64%) feel that release time/PLC is very beneficial with 33% feeling it is somewhat beneficial. All teachers feel that it is somewhat important to very important to keep parents involved and informed about their child’s education. They also feel that support staff assisting teachers during the literacy or math block is somewhat to very beneficial, as well as, using the TN state standards and TCAP objectives to guide instruction. Ninety percent (90%) feel it is very beneficial for special education teachers to collaborate with the regular classroom teachers in reading and/or math inclusion classes and 10% feel it is somewhat beneficial. All teachers (100%) feel that using hands-on activities and manipulatives for math instruction are very important. Sixty-six percent (66%) of teachers feel that it is very beneficial for tutoring teachers to go into the classroom (this is up from 52% last year) 26% feel it is somewhat beneficial and 8% feel it is not beneficial. Ninety-two percent (92%) of teachers feel it is very beneficial to provide additional instruction in the classroom to meet the needs of at-risk students. Eighty-nine percent (89%) of teachers feel that it is very beneficial to differentiate instruction by the use of small group and leveled book with 8% feeling it is somewhat beneficial. Thirty-six percent (36%) of teachers feel that they are differentiating instruction to the fullest while 61% feel that they are somewhat differentiating instruction. One teacher commented that center materials and instructional books would help her differentiate instruction to a greater degree. All teachers feel that having a computer lab assistant is somewhat to very beneficial and all feel that the websites that the school subscribes to are somewhat to very beneficial. Some teachers feel that it would be more beneficial to have a ninety minutes uninterrupted literacy block rather than having to have it in two sessions due to specialty block. Kindergarten teachers feel that it would benefit them to have specialty block after lunch. Some teachers indicated that at-risk students benefit more from small group pull out classes than from inclusion. Teachers indicated they would also like the Literacy Coach to go into classrooms on a weekly basis to guide in reading and writing.

 

Teachers listed the following suggestions for professional development activities:

Ideas for Professional Development:

·1 On- site training for literacy and math

·2 Differentiated Instruction

·3 Creating lesson plans using formularize instruction data

·4 Miscue analysis

·5 Singapore Math

·6 Release time to see/visit those teachers scoring 4 and 5 in the content areas. Locally or beyond

·7 Something to do with character education

·8 Need for deeper understanding or reading instruction and how to take road to higher thinking levels.

·9 Need ideas for small group instruction in math!

·10 Grade level meetings and classroom time

·11 Manipulative use – best practices

·12 Workshop with Peggy Rush Campbell

·13 Technology/Interactive Technology applications/Promethean board training

·14 Classroom management

 

School Climate Survey: Students,

Fall 2007

84% of the students surveyed feel our school provides a positive environment and programs that equip them with skills to enhance their learning. 82% think the teacher/student learning relationship is good, but would like to have more access to computers. 81% deem the school a welcoming environment for students and parents, providing stimulating activities.
School Climate Survey:

Community,

Fall 2007

A community opinion inventory indicates that the community thinks a high quality education is taking place. 83% agreed that dedicated teachers, who have personal connections with students, are prevalent and that our curriculum relates to everyday life, offering learning opportunities for a full range of abilities. A concern for 58% is a lack of school-wide discipline. At least 50% showed a continued concern about bullying. The community opinion surveys also indicate a need for playground improvements, more money for materials and supplies, and a general need for improved security and dismissal safety.

 

TEMPLATE 1.3.2: Narrative and Analysis of Relevant School and Community Data

Some of the factors to consider in this narrative and analysis might be historical background, facilities, environmental and safety concerns, socio-economic factors, parent/guardian demographics, honors classes, unique programs, parental support, school-business partnerships, major employers, and any other demographic factor (school or community) of major impact, including major changes and/or events that have adversely impacted your school..

TEMPLATE 1.3.2: School and Community Data

(Rubric Indicator 1.3)

Narrative and analysis of relevant school and community factors:
Student Characteristics

The student enrollment at Riverside Elementary, as of March 4, 2011, was 529. The ethnic student population of Riverside Elementary School is composed of 50.09% Caucasian, 35.54% African American 14.37% Hispanic. Of this number there are 3 students classified as homeless. There are sixty-two students enrolled in the English Language Learner (ELL) class. There are a total of 74 students (14%) receiving special education services. O Some are enrolled in more than one program. They include 42% in resource only, 23% in resource and inclusion, 43% in resource and speech/language, 27% in speech/language only, and 3% on consultation.

At Riverside, the Free and Reduced Lunch Program is currently serving 89% of the school’s population.

All students at Riverside are in classes with certified teachers who have met or are meeting highly qualified status under No Child Left Behind guidelines.

As of March 4, 2011 four students have been transferred to the Alternative School for disciplinary action and one hundred-twenty-five (125) referrals to our administration. No student has violated drug, alcohol, or tobacco policies.

Riverside Elementary maintained a daily attendance average of 96% during the first semester of the current school year with an average mobility rate of 15%. The promotion rate for the 2009-2010 year was 98%.

The data compiled through an elementary student opinion inventory indicates that students are generally happy with their learning experiences at Riverside. Students state it is a pleasant environment, but list some concerns with bullying. Playground improvements were suggested by students.

Staff Characteristics

Administration, faculty, and staff demographics

The professional staff of Riverside consists of the following: a principal, a part-time assistant principal, a school-wide facilitator, a librarian, a music teacher, an art teacher, a physical education teacher, a guidance counselor, two special education teachers, a speech/language therapist, three Title I reading teachers, one of whom also serves as school-wide facilitator , and a Title I math teacher, one full-time English Language Learner teacher, two preschool teachers, and twenty-five regular classroom teachers. We also have one School Resource Officer, a part-time nurse, a part-time gifted teacher, and a part-time school psychologist as support staff. All are Highly Qualified under No Child Left Behind guidelines. Should it become necessary, the school will provide each individual parent timely notice that the parent’s child has been assigned to, or taught for four or more consecutive weeks by a teacher who is not highly qualified. At this time no teacher is teaching outside of his/her area of certification. Teachers at Riverside are involved in a variety of leadership activities including committees for TSSIP, SACS, QAR, CADRE, Riverside Leadership Committee, and Knowledge Bowl. They are also involved in countywide teams, such as Crisis Management, and professional organizations, such as the Delta Kappa Gamma Society, American Association of University Women, MCEA, TEA, NEA and PET. A significant number of teachers have received grants and/or leadership training to improve the educational environment at Riverside. Twenty-one teachers have a bachelors degree, eleven hold a masters degree, eight hold a masters plus, and two have an Ed S degree. Forty-eight percent (48%) of Riverside’s faculty have taught at Riverside from 1-5 years, seventeen percent (17%) have taught at Riverside for 6-10 years, five percent (5%) have taught at Riverside for 11-15 years, two percent (2%) have taught at Riverside for 16-20 years, and twenty-eight percent (28%) have taught at Riverside over 20 years. Nineteen percent (19%) of Riverside’s faculty have from 1-5 years experience, fourteen percent (14%) from 6-10 years experience, seventeen percent (17%) have from 11-15 years experience, ten percent (10%) have 16-20 years experience and forty percent (40%) have over 20 years experience.

Support Staff

Riverside’s support staff consists of a secretary, an attendance clerk, out sourced custodians. Riverside has twelve paraprofessionals that work in a collaborative effort with the faculty and staff to assist with the educational needs of students. Of the twelve paraprofessionals, all are highly qualified as per the requirements of Maury County Schools. The cafeteria staff consists of one cafeteria manager and five cafeteria workers. The Maury County School system has thirteen literacy coaches, a testing coach, and countywide computer technicians. Riverside also has 1 Centerstone Project BASIC counselor.

Race and Ethnicity of Staff Members

The racial configuration of the professional and support staff at Riverside is composed of 83% white females, 6% African-American females, 1% Hispanic females, 3% white males, and 1% African-American males. The ethnicity of the group encompasses European, African, and Spanish backgrounds.

Strategies to Attract Highly Qualified Teachers

Atmosphere

Riverside Elementary is a personable and family-like school. Generations of families have attended and supported our school. Our Principal has worked hard to establish and maintain a professional learning community of teachers, staff, students, parents, and community members. The professional learning community works together to educate our students. Our Principal is respected as an instructional leader and exhibits expertise in the day-to-day operation of the school. He has high expectations of all those involved in the educational process. Discipline issues are handled in an appropriate and timely manner. He supports all school employees and treats them with respect. Riverside has a mentoring teacher to work with new teachers along with the district’s mentoring staff. Grade levels also meet weekly for planning and support. The literacy leader works with grade levels, as well as, giving support to individual teachers. Riverside also plans productive PLC meetings.

Riverside also has a school-wide mentoring program. The program provides support to teachers that are new to a grade level, our school, the district, and the profession. We have two faculty members that have been trained in the state model for mentoring on our staff. Our lead mentor coordinates meetings and various informative activities for mentors and those being mentored. Currently we have one interim and twelve full time teachers in the program which usually lasts until tenure is received. Riverside has a full-time Literacy Coach who provides embedded professional development for teachers on ways to implement best practices in literacy. Riverside has a school-wide facilitator who works with teachers to help them secure materials and supplies, as well as, equipment for their classrooms. Promethean Boards have been installed in all regular k-4 classrooms and Safari Montage is available school-wide in all classrooms.

Professional development is another important strategy to attract and retain highly qualified teachers. Our Principal strives to implement quality researched –based professional development that will enhance classroom instruction. Teachers are encouraged to seek out other development opportunities that align with our district’s standards. A full-time Literacy Coach also provides professional development for teachers. The school-wide facilitator keeps teachers informed of district level and state level professional development opportunities. She also helps them with the professional development paper work.

School Characteristics

Historical Background

Nestled between the Duck River and the Riverside neighborhood, Riverside Elementary School first opened its doors in 1936. A new building, completed in 1983, is adjacent to the former school building, and the parking lot lies where the original school once stood.

Facilities

Riverside Elementary School is a 63,000 square feet facility with thirty-eight classrooms, a library, an art room, and a music room, math lab and computer lab. Each classroom has at least one computer with Internet access and all K-4 regular classrooms have been equipped with Promethean Boards. Some classrooms without Promethean Boards, have access to projectors and mimeos. The cafeteria holds 216 students and includes a stage area for special performances and activities. The gymnasium is equipped with basketball goals and bleachers to accommodate seating for 350 occupants.

A new computer lab was established during the fall of 2005 and became operational in December 2005. The computer lab became possible due to the generosity of Columbia State Community College, who donated sixty computers to the school system. The computer lab has twenty student stations and a teacher workstation with wireless Internet access and the capability to run all network software.

The Riverside Elementary Library received a facelift during the summer of 2005. The PTA purchased new carpet for the library, librarian’s office, and media rooms. Faculty members spent countless hours taking books off the shelves, painting the walls, wiping off every book, and shelving the books back into the proper place. The facelift has made a tremendous difference in the appearance of our library. Each class has an assigned fifty minute block each week and there is a period of time each morning for book exchange.

The intercom system was updated in the spring of 2006.

Environmental and Safety Concerns

Riverside was designed in the early 1980’s. Only the main front doors remain unlocked during the school day. Each classroom has an outside exit and can only be accessed from the outside with a key. All outside doors allow unrestricted exits. Small rooms have access through the next-door classroom for emergency exits. Security cameras, strategically placed throughout the building, also allow for extra precautionary measures.

Riverside Elementary strives to maintain the safety of each child and staff member. A School Resource Officer (SRO) is 100% funded through the Maury County Sheriff’s Department and is on duty when children are in the building. The Crisis Management Team, along with all staff members, has developed a well-defined emergency plan. Faculty and staff members are trained during in-services and workshops on effective strategies to deal with emergencies. Fire, inclement weather, and intruder drills are practiced on a regular basis. Safety programs are presented by local agencies to enhance the educational environment.

Each child’s blue information card, on file in the office, contains information regarding persons with permission to take a child from school. Due to the school’s close proximity of the street, staff members are constantly supervising outside dismissal. Our staff has access to eleven two-way radios used throughout the day during recess, various activities and assemblies, afternoon dismissal, and bus room supervision.

Grade Distribution, Length of School Year/Day

Riverside serves a total of 529 students in Prek through fourth grade. We have two pre-kindergarten classes that serve forty children. Other students are distributed as follows: one hundred twelve kindergarteners, ninety-two first graders, ninety-three second graders, one hundred four third graders, and eighty-five fourth graders. The school system operates on a state mandated 180-day calendar, with an additional ten in-service days for teachers. The school uses a nine-week grading period followed by two weeks of break. During the spring and fall breaks, one week of remediation is provided for at-risk students. The school opens at 7:30 with instructional time from 8:15 – 3:15. The school day consists of seven hours for students and seven and a half for staff. Teachers are provided with a daily planning period and duty-free lunch period.

 

Operating Budget and Per Pupil Expenditures

The Maury County School System’s expenditures per student for regular instruction are:

System

State

Federal

 

 

 

 

 

$7,652

 

$7,794

 

$8,554

 

The Maury County School System receives funding:

System

State

Federal

 

 

 

 

 

38.1%

 

51.6%

 

10.3%

 

Title Funds include: Title I, Title II, Title IIA, Title IID, and Title V. Title I funds are used school-wide for salary and benefits of a School-wide Facilitator, two collaborative reading teachers, a collaborative math teacher, and four collaborative assistants (three reading and a math). The other Title funds are distributed according to their specified use (e.g.. materials and supplies, equipment, professional development, parent involvement). During the school years 2009-2010 and 2010-2011 stimulus money has provided for two additional Title I educational assistants. These two positions will no longer be funding after this year.

Curriculum Offerings, Unique Programs, and Honor Classes

The Instructional Program

Riverside’s curriculum offers a wide range of opportunities for students in pre-k through grade four. The instructional staff works collaboratively by grade level, following the State of Tennessee Curriculum Standards. The school system also provides additional research based training for the faculty. Tutoring for reading is offered for kindergarten through fourth grades with tutoring for Math offered in grades two through four. Resource and Speech/Language services are available for students in Pre Kindergarten through fourth grade. The first grade teachers have implemented a cross curriculum literacy circle where students rotate between teachers for enrichment. One special education inclusion class has been created for reading in grade two. Fourth grade students partner with and read to kindergarten and first grade students.

The staff members at Riverside have implemented the following additional instructional programs to better meet the needs of students: Accelerated Reader program in conjunction with the STAR reading assessment, the Accelerated Math program, Rigby Reading program, Math in a Flash, IXL Math, Daily Oral Language, as well as individual classroom programs and incentives.

The school provides a minimum of ninety- minute daily literacy block in grades kindergarten through fourth with an additional 60 minutes throughout the day. Due to block scheduling of specialty classes, some classes are unable to have an uninterrupted literacy block during the morning.

Block Classes

The students at Riverside are provided with music, art, library, and physical education classes for fifty minutes each week. Guidance classes are held weekly for thirty minutes. Kindergarten through grade three receives an additional thirty minutes bi-monthly of guidance through a grant with Centerstone Counseling Center.

The Remediation Program

School federal funds provide for six 70 hour extended contracts for before/after school and/or fall/spring remediation for at-risk students. School federal funds also provide for one 35 hour extended contract for a math tutor for 4th grade at-risk students. A federal grant provides for two after school and summer tutors for ELL students. Peer tutoring has been very successful in providing additional assistance to students on a daily basis. Summer School is provided each year by extended contract funding. Teachers recommend students for the four week remediation program. Summer remediation classes meet7 hours per day for five days per week and are integrated with the summer enrichment program. Federal funds provided extended contracts for 6 teachers and 4 assistants for a summer 2011 enrichment program.

Parent/Guardian Demographics

Riverside did a random survey of parents from each leadership member’s classroom. Those responding were 60% white, 35% African American, 10% Hispanic. Twelve percent (12%) were males and 88% females. Results show that 72% are employed and 28% unemployed. Sixty percent (60%) are married, 6% divorced, and 34% single. Seventy-nine percent (79%) indicated that they have a computer in the home and of that percentage, 80% have internet connection.

Community Characteristics

Riverside Elementary School is located in Columbia, Tennessee, which is the county seat of Maury County. Maury County is located approximately forty-three miles south of Nashville. According to the 2009 census, the population of Maury County is 80190, and Columbia’s population is 33,055. In the city of Columbia, there are 24,669 Caucasians, 6,984 African Americans, ninety-two Native Americans or Alaskan Natives, nine Native Hawaiians and other Pacific Islanders, and a growing number of Hispanics.

There are forty-four industries and small businesses located in Maury County. The unemployment rate of Maury County as of April 2006 is 5%. The median family income is $55,771, the median household income is $45,724 and the personal income per capita is $28,126. There are 9.7% of families and 13.2% of individuals below the poverty level.

In addition to the twenty public schools in Maury County there are two private schools, a community college and two regional technical schools. 26.2% of the county’s population is under the age of eighteen.

The community is involved with the school through Partners in Education. They provide support with projects in the individual schools that they adopt. Community members are involved with school sponsored activities and projects involving the students.

 

Coordination of Services With Other Programs

Under the NCLB law, coordination of services to children is required where possible. Riverside strives to coordinate all these services. ELL students receive assistance from a full-time ELL teacher. Title I funds provide an interpreter for parents of ELL students during Parent/Teacher conferences. ELL teachers are included in staff development where appropriate. Materials and supplies are purchased with Title III funds. Books and supplies may also be checked out from Riverside library and bookroom. Through a district ELL Grant extended contracts are provided for two Riverside teachers to tutor ELL students before/after school. ELL contracts will also fund two teachers for Riverside’s Summer Program.

Students with disabilities are served by special education teachers .They also receive services from their classroom teacher and educational assistants. There is one inclusion class for literacy in second grade. Coordination of educational plan and student progress will be shared with special teachers; parents and classroom teachers. Special education teachers will be included in staff development where appropriate.

Students who have attended Head Start and other locally operated readiness programs records are studied and included in the student’s permanent record.

Title II monies are consistently used for professional development of staff members through in-house workshops and in-services, and by sending teachers to special workshops off campus. These teachers attend these workshops with the understanding that they will extend this training by sharing information with the remaining staff members. Title II Part D will be used for technology professional development. Our school guidance counselor handles some vocational or career awareness with several grade levels. Riverside has a partnership with two area businesses. Teachers also incorporate career awareness in instruction on a daily basis as applicable to their lessons and grade appropriate. At-risk students receive tutoring before/after school, during intercessions, and during the summer from teachers receiving extended contracts. Riverside Summer Program is a combination of remedial classes as well as enrichment classes. These programs are funded with both Title I and general purpose funds. The Homeless Liaison of Maury County will be our consultant helping with any child that meets any of the Title X requirements. Homeless students will be identified and immediately tested for at-risk services. Riverside’s attendance clerk, upon learning of the status of a homeless child, will be responsible for passing this information on to the proper persons. Title IV funds are used for crisis management and for the Safety and Drug Free School Program.

Transitional Coordination Plan

Preschoolers Entering Kindergarten:

Kindergarten registration for Riverside is April 26, 2011r. Parents will receive informational brochures "Making the Move to Kindergarten" along with a summer "Getting Ready for School" activity calendar. Parents will also be invited to tour the school and visit a kindergarten classroom after registration.

Kelly Myers, Federal Programs Coordinator and Barbara Baltzer, Federal Programs Facilitator meet annually in the spring with parents of Head Start students at College Hill. The parents are informed about the pre-registration procedures, proof of medical records, and record of birth. They discuss the parent handbooks in The Starting School Kit that each child receives at the end of the year at Head Start.

4th Grade Students Entering Middle School Next Year:

For the school year 2011-2012 4th grade Riverside students will be moving into middle school. Graduation ceremonies will be held for 4th graders on May 24, 2010. Riverside will provide literature to parents about children making the transition to middle school. Cox Middle School will hold a Cougar Camp in June for incoming students. An open house/orientation will be held in July prior to the beginning of school for new students and parents. Brochures will go home with Riverside 4th graders before the end of the 2010-2011 school year. Cox Middle School will hold a school-wide open house after the beginning of the 2011-2012 school year.

 

 

 

Component 1b – Academic and Non-Academic Data Analysis/Synthesis

TEMPLATE 1.4: Variety of Academic and Non-Academic Assessment Measures

Refer to Component 1 Academic/Nonacademic Helpful Hints.

TEMPLATE 1.4: Variety of Academic and Non-Academic Assessment Measures

(Rubric Indicator 1.4)

List Data Sources
▪ No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) Results

▪ 2011 TCAP Results

▪ 2011 Tennessee Value Added Assessments (TVAAS)

▪ 2011 Report Card

▪ 2011-2012 Kindergarten County-wide Screening

▪ 2011-2012 Think Link Learning Predictive Assessment

▪ 2011-2012 English Language Development Assessment (ELDA)

▪ K-4 Portfolios

▪ K-4 Running Records

▪ Brigance Preschool Screen-II 4 Year-Old Assessment

▪ Title 1 Needs Assessment

▪ Attendance

▪ Promotion

▪ Discipline

BMI health results

School Health Index

School Health Improvement Plan

 

 

TEMPLATE 1.5: Data Collection and Analysis

Describe the data collection and analysis process used in determining your strengths and needs. Collection refers to the types of data gathered. Analysis would be the process used for the full review of all data gathered.

TEMPLATE 1.5: Data Collection and Analysis

(Rubric Indicator 1.5)

Describe the data collection and analysis process used in determining your strengths and needs.
A variety of assessments is used in grades pre-kindergarten through grade four to level and monitor progress of students as well as to evaluate the effectiveness of teaching methods. Teachers meet weekly in grade level meetings, four times per year in PLC meetings, and during release time to analyze this data.

The following is presented as information and data gathered on assessments used at Riverside Elementary.

Brigance Preschool Screen-II 4 Year-Old Assessment

The Brigance Screen-II provides a sampling of children's language, motor, social-emotional, and early learning skills as well as identifies developmental delays, such as language, learning, or cognitive. A pretest is given in August, and a posttest is given in May to the preschool students.

Kindergarten County-wide Screening

A kindergarten county-wide survey was administered to children entering kindergarten in the fall of 2010. This survey replaced the Phelps Test that had been used in the past. This survey addresses prior knowledge of such things as higher order thinking, verbal reasoning, analogies, rhyme awareness, book awareness, memory for sentences, name writing, vocabulary, draw a person, visual motor, as well as, number observations which includes counting by rote memory, one-to-one correspondence, instant recognition, conservation of number, and numeral recognition.

Portfolio (Kindergarten – 4th Grade)

A portfolio is a collection of students’ work. The portfolio is comprised of writings and drawings that the student has composed. These various works are added each month to the portfolio. There is conferencing with the student as work is evaluated in order to increase students’ awareness of accomplishments and weaknesses. At this time goals are set to help students assume greater responsibility in reaching appropriate standards.

A portfolio provides clear examples of students’ work at the various developmental levels of performance. It provides concrete examples to both parents and teachers of proficiency of performance and serves as an important means of assessment. A portfolio is a useful tool in monitoring the growth and development of each child as he/she becomes an independent reader and writer.

 

Running Records for Literacy (Kindergarten – 4th Grade)

Teachers in kindergarten through fourth grade use running records for instructional purposes to guide them in their decisions about the student’s progress. The running record allows the teacher to record the student’s reading behavior. The information gained using the running records is an invaluable tool for planning the next stage of learning.

 

Discovery Education Assessment (ThinkLink) Data

Discovery Education Assessment (ThinkLink) is given to assess student growth while preparing to meet state standards for reading/ language arts and math. The test provides teachers the prediction of mastery, proficiency, and adequate yearly progress (AYP). Discovery Education Assessment is given in grades K-4.

Latest Data as of April 2011

Test 1 First Grade

Proficient/advanced Basic/Below Basic

Reading Math Reading Math

17.2% 14.6% 82.7% 85.4%

Test 2

Proficient/advanced Basic/Below Basic

Reading Math Reading Math

2nd Grade 49.5% 47.3% 50.6% 52.7%

Kdg. 71.6% 57.4% 28.4% 42.6%

3rd and 4th grade Discovery Data – November 2011

Test 1 Proficient/advanced Basic/Below Basic

Reading Math Reading Math

3rd Grade 55.4 71.2 44.6 28.7

4th Grade 43.3 47.3 56.6 52.7

 

English Language Development Assessment

The English Language Development Assessment (ELDA) is series of comprehensive assessments that measure annual progress in English language skills of English language learners. Scores for individual students indicate one of five possible proficiency levels, ranging from pre-functional to fully English proficient, in listening, speaking, reading, writing, and comprehension. A composite score is calculated from all of the required domains. The ELDA is given each spring to students currently being served in ELL.

Fifty-eight students took the ELDA in the spring of 2009. The results from the 2009 assessment show that 5% of our ELL students were Pre-Functional, 21% were Lower Intermediate, 16% were Upper-Intermediate, 36% were Advanced, and 22% were Fully English Proficient.

Tennessee Comprehensive Assessment Program (TCAP)

TCAP scores in reading/language arts 2010-2011 indicate that 34% of Riverside 3rd graders were proficient or above. Thirty-seven percent (37%) of the males tested were proficient/advanced and 30% of the females were proficient/advanced. The percentage proficient/advanced for subgroups include: whites 39%, African Americans 29%, and Hispanics 27%. Our economically disadvantaged group was 31% proficient/advanced.

TCAP scores in reading/language arts 2010-2011 indicate that 28% of Riverside 4th graders were proficient or above. Thirty-two percent (32%) of the males tested were proficient/advanced and twenty-two (22%) of the females were proficient/advanced. The percentage proficient/advanced for subgroups include: whites34%, African Americans 25%, and Hispanics 10%. Our economically disadvantaged group was 25% proficient/advanced.

TCAP scores in math 2010-2011 indicate that 34% of Riverside 3rd graders were proficient or above. Forty-two percent (42%) of the males tested were proficient/advanced and 26% of the females tested were proficient/advanced. The percentage proficient/advanced for subgroups include: whites 43%, African Americans 27% and Hispanics 25%. Our economically disadvantaged is 28%.

TCAP scores in math 2010-2011 indicate 29% of Riverside 4th graders were proficient or above. Thirty-four percent (34%) of the males tested were proficient/advanced, and 22% females tested were proficient/advanced. The percentage proficient/advanced for subgroups include: whites 36%, African Americans 21% and Hispanics 20%. Our economically disadvantaged group is 25%

This data indicates that there is a weakness in both reading and math with females weaker in both areas than males.

Even though our percentages proficient/advanced for both reading and math are low, our value added scores indicate growth. Our value added for 2011 in math was 5 and our value added in reading for 2011 was 3.6.

TCAP scores in social studies 2010-2011 indicate that 75% of Riverside 3rd graders were proficient or above. Seventy-eight percent (78%) of the males tested were proficient/advanced and 70% of the females tested were proficient/advanced. The percentage proficient/advanced for subgroups include: whites 84%, African Americans 63%, and Hispanics 75%. Our economically disadvantaged is 70%.

TCAP scores in social studies 2010-2011 indicate that 29% of Riverside 4th graders were proficient or above. Eighty-two percent (82%) of the males tested were proficient/advanced and 94% of females tested were proficient/advanced. The percentage proficient/advanced for subgroups include: whites 91%, African Americans 82%, and Hispanics 80%. Our economically disadvantaged is 85%.

TCAP scores in science 2010-2011 indicate that 52% of Riverside 3rd graders were proficient or above. Sixty-two percent (62%) of the males tested were proficient/advanced and 39% of females tested were proficient/advanced. The percentage proficient/advanced for subgroups include: whites 59%, African Americans 45%, and Hispanics 42 %. Our economically disadvantaged is 43%.

TCAP scores in science 2010-2011 indicate that 22% of Riverside 4th graders were proficient or above. Twenty-eight percent (28%) of the males tested were proficient/advanced and 13% of females tested were proficient/advanced. The percentage proficient/advanced for subgroups include: whites 30%, African Americans 11%, and Hispanics 20%. Our economically disadvantaged is 22%.

This data indicates that social studies is our strongest area and the only academic area in which females out perform males.

School Health Index and School Health Improvement Plan

By using the SHI, we will be able to identify our areas of strength and our areas that need to be strengthened. Areas that score 0-20% will be our areas we need to strengthen. Areas that score 75% and higher will be identified as our areas of strength. These prevention programs have a direct correlation to graduation rates, attendance rates, discipline, and test scores. Maintaining our Healthy School Team, Coordinated School Health Initiatives, and School Health Improvement Plan will help reduce non-academic barriers to learning.

BMI

Riverside Elementary School tested 503 students during the BMI screening, with the following results:

Underweight – 20.12 (4%)

At-Risk of Overweight – 110.66 (22%)

Normal – 281.68 (56%)

Overweight – 90.54 (18%)

Testing was voluntary and parental consent was obtained prior to screening. Riverside Elementary faculty and staff are dedicated to teaching food, health, and eating habits.

 

 

TEMPLATE 1.6: Report Card Data Disaggregation

Provide narrative analysis of disaggregated Report Card data. Disaggregation is the separating of data into pieces for a detailed review. The results would focus on what you learn about the individual data pieces.

TEMPLATE 1.6: Report Card Data Disaggregation

(Rubric Indicator 1.6)

Report Card Data Disaggregation
Riverside Elementary is currently not in good standing in regards to NCLB status. Riverside did not meet adequate yearly progress (AYP) in 2011 and has a target status.

AYP Calculations in Reading

The 2011 Reading AYP subgroup disaggregation for grades three and four indicate that the NCLB mandate of 95% Proficient/Advanced was not met for all subgroups.

 

 

 

The 2011 Reading AYP subgroup disaggregation for grades three and four is as follows:

% Basic/Below Basic % Proficient/Advanced

·1 All Students 70.1 30

·2 African Americans 75.8 25

·3 White 64 36

·4 Economically Disadvantaged 73.5 26

In 2011, the Hispanic subgroup had 20% Proficient/Advanced and 80% basic or below basic. Students with Disabilities subgroup had 16% Proficient/Advanced and 84% basic or below basic. However, both of these groups had less than 45 students in each group.

 

AYP Calculations in Math

The 2011 Math AYP subgroup disaggregation for grades three and four indicates that the NCLB mandate of 95% Proficient/Advanced was not met for all subgroups.

 

The 2011 Math AYP subgroup disaggregation for grades three and four is as follows:

% Basic/Below Basic % Proficient/Advanced

·1 All Students 68.1 32

·2 African Americans 77.5 23

·3 White 59.8 40

·4 Economically Disadvantaged 74.5 26

In 2011, the Hispanic subgroup had 25% Proficient/Advanced and 75% basic and below basic. Students with Disabilities subgroup had 8% Proficient/Advanced and 92% basic and below basic. However, both of these subgroups had less than 45 students per group.

 

 

 

TCAP Writing Assessment for Fifth Grade

Riverside’s TCAP Writing Score for fifth grade continued to be in good standing with a score of 4 and grade of A in 2010. This was the last year for Riverside fifth grade writing assessment due to rezoning. Fifth grade is now moved to middle school leaving Riverside with a Pre-k through grade 4 school.

 

 

 

Academic Growth (Value Added)

Riverside’s 2011 4th grade Value Added – Growth Standard mean gain in math is -0.9 and a D status. Reading/Language mean gain is 1.6 and a B status. Social Studies mean gain is -2.2 with an F status. Science, mean gain -1.8 and a D status. Riverside’s 3-year average for math is 1.7; 3-year average for reading is 3; 3 year average for Social Studies is -2.4; and 3 year average for science is -1.3.

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TEMPLATE 1.7: Narrative Synthesis of All Data

Give a narrative synthesis of all data. Synthesis would be the blending of the data reviews to give the big picture.

TEMPLATE 1.7: Narrative Synthesis of All Data

(Rubric Indicator 1.7)

Narrative Synthesis of Data
Riverside continues to be committed in the collection, analysis, and synthesis of all data. The data collected from the TCAP, Writing Assessment, and Value-Added Scores have made the biggest impact on the decision to target specific goals. Riverside has also seen the value of the ThinkLink Assessments. Training for ThinkLink assessments has helped in identifying strengths and weaknesses as well as identifying gaps in the curriculum. Other formative assessments also play an important role in monitoring academic progress.

Strengths

Our proficient/advance in reading and math are both low, however, value added indicates growth in both areas. Our value added in math was 4.3 which was the highest in the county. Our value added in reading was 1.5 which was the second highest in the county. Fifth grade students have been rezoned to middle school for this school year, however, the 2009 writing score was 4 with a grade of A. This has remained unchanged for the past two years.

 

 

Needs

The change to higher rigor and higher level thinking skills produced a dramatic drop in both the AYP results and value added results for math in 2009. Increased professional development and improvement in our Professional Learning Community commitment will be required in order for Riverside students to meet the new standards for achievement in upcoming state testing for the next few years.

 

 

 

TEMPLATE 1.8: Prioritized List of Goal Targets

List in priority order your goal targets. The goals for Component 4 (Action Plan) will be derived from this prioritized list of goal targets. Prioritized goals would identify the most critical areas of need and where your wok would start.

TEMPLATE 1.8: Prioritized List of Goal Targets

(Rubric Indicator 1.8)

Prioritized List of Goal Targets

Goal 1: Reading/Language Plus Writing

·1 The percentage of students scoring Proficient/Advanced in Reading/Language Plus Writing in grades 3-4 will increase as follows to meet or exceed NCLB Benchmarks:

All Students – 5% by 2012

African American - 6% by 2012

Hispanic – 6 % by 2012

Economically Disadvantaged – 5% by 2012

Students with Disabilities – 5% by 2012

·2 The percentage of students in each subgroup and overall for Reading/Language Plus Writing and math will increase 5% from the Proficient to the Advanced performance level by 2012

·3 Students in K-2 will demonstrate success on developmentally appropriate measures.

Goal 2: Math

·1 The percentage of students scoring Proficient/Advanced in Math will increase as followis to meet or exceed NCLB benchmarks:

All students – 5% by 2012

African American – 6% by 2012

Hispanic – 6% by 2012

Economically Disadvantaged – 5% by 2012

Students with Disabilities – 5% b6 2012

·2 The percentage of students in each subgroup and overall for Reading/Language Plus Writing and Math will increase 5% from the Proficient to the Advanced performance by 2012/

 

 

 

 

Component 2 – Beliefs, Common Mission and Shared Vision

TEMPLATE 2.1: Beliefs, Common Mission and Shared Vision

Use Template 2.1 to articulate your Beliefs, Common Mission and Shared Vision

Template 2.1: Beliefs, Common Mission and Shared Vision

(Rubric Indicators 2.1 and 2.2)

Beliefs
Riverside Elementary School’s mission statement and belief statements that were developed in 2001 were reviewed by a task group consisting of members of the faculty, support personnel, parents, community representatives, and the School Resource Officer. The committee also studied the data from Riverside’s National Study of School Evaluation compiled February 2006 which surveyed faculty, support personnel, students, and a random selection of parents and community members and leaders. Analysis of this information by the stakeholders and discussion by the group members resulted in revisions being made in the original mission and belief statements. A vision statement (not required in 2001) was developed to complement the beliefs and mission statements.

Between meetings, task group members presented these belief, mission, and vision statements to other faculty, parents, students, and community members resulting in revisions and clarifications. The final draft was presented to a cross-section of the stakeholders and consensus was reached. Our mission, vision, and belief statements are posted in the main hallway of the Riverside School building and on the Riverside website.

Beliefs

1. Our chief priority is to ensure that all students will master appropriate academic skills through different methods and educational experiences.

2. Standards-based assessment of student performance in core academic areas is used to indicate the teaching strategies that will best enable all students to attain or exceed state and local proficiency standards.

3. School policies and procedures provide a safe, supportive, and orderly instructional environment that encourages the self-reliance, self-respect, and self-discipline necessary for optimal student growth.

4. Frequent, clearly-defined communication among staff, parents, students, and our community is vital to the decision-making process and to the academic and social development of our students.

5. Our school is an inviting and nurturing place for all students to develop into productive citizens.

 

Common Mission
The mission of Riverside Elementary School is to provide an environment enriched with integrity and respect so that all students have the opportunity to become successful and responsible citizens. They are encouraged to advance at a maximum individual rate intellectually, physically, socially, and emotionally. The utilization of data-driven results and the high expectations of achievement allow all students the potential to be able to reach proficient or advanced levels on all state and local standards.
Shared Vision
The vision of Riverside Elementary School is to involve all stakeholders in making decisions that will result in raising the academic performance of all students to proficient or beyond through quality educational experiences.

TEMPLATE 3.1.a: Curricular Practices

Template 3.1.a: Curricular Practices

(Rubric Indicators 3.1 and 3.2)

Current Curricular Practices

Tennessee Standards Based Curriculum

Prioritized and Mapped Curriculum

Schoolwide Student Achievement Benchmarks

Grade Appropriate Standards-Based Literacy and Math Model

Formative Assessment to Align with State Benchmarks

A Reliable Support System to Enhance Curriculum and Instruction

Communication of a Shared Vision with Students and Stake-holders

Evidence of Practice (State in definitive/tangible terms) Curriculum is based on the TN State Standards.

Every teacher has a copy of the Blueprint for Learning.

Established objectives at every grade level

District wide curriculum mapping per state standards

Balanced literacy goals are established and posted

Currently training through CDDRE to improve the rigor of our curriculum.

 

Appropriate benchmarks are identified at each level.

Percentage of students meeting or exceeding AYP benchmarks is increasing annually.

Teachers strive to meet AYP benchmarks as well as TVAAS goals.

Goals are set to increase proficiency in reading and math.

Literacy bookroom containing fiction and non-fiction leveled readers is available to all teachers.

Guided Reading through Daily 5, RTI, and Star Growth Reports are being used to improve student achievement.

Monthly writing exercises in every grade level K-5 assessed by a district-wide literacy rubric.

Number of students proficient in math has increased for the last three years in fourth grade

AYP goals have been met by all tested grades

Accelerated Math program is used consistently in grades 3-5 to individually assess both strengths and weaknesses in students.

Accelerated Reader Program is used consistently in grades K-5 in order to assess student comprehension

Students in grades 3-5 take the Tennessee Comprehen-sive Assessment Program (TCAP) each spring. The achievement test is a timed, multiple- choice assessment that measures skills in Reading, Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, and Social Studies.

4Sight is a benchmark assessment tool for grades 3-5 that enables the teacher to predict students’ reading and math achievement multiple times throughout the year.

ThinkLink assesses student progress in grades 2-5 toward meeting state standards for reading/ language arts and math to provide teachers the prediction of mastery, proficiency, and AYP.

The English Language Development Assessment (ELDA) is a battery of tests designed to measure annual progress in English language proficiency among ELL students in grades K-5.

TCAP Writing Assessment is a 35- minute narrative written by fifth graders and scored on a scale of 0-6, following the state rubric.

DIBELS is administered three times per year in kindergarten and 1st grade. Students’ progress is monitored to check that reading achievement is improving.

Implementation of Professional Learning Communities in which the focus is collaboration to determine what the teachers want the students to learn, how the teacher knows if the students have learned it, and what the teacher will do if the students do not learn it.

Continuous professional development for all staff and faculty provided by the district through Title and other funds.

PTA provides volunteer time in classrooms and funding to classrooms for instructional materials and supplies.

Administrator and CDDRE team members perform walk- throughs to address the rigor of curriculum in relation to 4Sight and ThinkLink and TCAP testing.

Our school administrator, along with our strategic planning committee, maintains a focus on AYP targets and student achievement.

Administrator communicates with parents through various meetings, such as Title, PTA, phone calls, conferences, and periodic newsletters.

Our Adopt-a-School partnership with Vulcan Materials has provided monies for school projects and materials used for students and to support communication with our stakeholders.

 

School website can be accessed through county website.

Several

teachers have individual web pages that can be accessed through school website.

Is the current practice research-based? Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Is it a principle & practice of high-performing schools? Yes

90-90-90 Schools

Yes

Characteristics of High-Performing Schools

Yes

Effective

Schools, Common Practices-12 ingredients of success from Tennessee’s most effective schools

Yes

Effective Schools, Common Practices-12 ingredients of success from Tennessee’s most effective schools

Yes

Characteristics of High-Performing Schools

Effective Schools, Common Practices-12 ingredients of success from Tennessee’s most effective schools

Yes

Effective Schools, Common Practices-12 ingredients of success from Tennessee’s most effective schools

Yes

Characteristics of High-Performing Schools

Has the current practice been effective or ineffective? Effective Effective in grades where curriculum maps are in place.

Those grades without a curriculum map must use planning time to pace their curriculum.

Effective in grade levels where vertical articulation occurs.

Our data shows this practice has made an impact by targeting specific skills/goals for each grade level, but we must continue to evaluate student progress.

Effective when teachers have individual conferences with students to show strengths and areas that need work. Effective Effective in grade levels that meet at least once per week to address curricular concerns and student achievement. Effective

for those individuals with internet capabilities to access the school and teacher web pages.

A concern is that the county, school, and teacher web pages are not meeting the needs of our growing non-English speaking population.

What data source(s) do you have that support your answer? (identify all applicable sources) TCAP, TVAAS, CRT, TSIPP, AYP, DIBELS, School/District and State report cards, school-made report cards Reduction in duplication of thematic studies between grade levels

TCAP, TCAP Writing Assessment, TVAAS,AYP

TCAP, TCAP Writing Assessment, TVAAS,

AYP

Star Growth Reports, AR Diagnostic Reports, DIBELS reports, Monthly Writing Assessments, AM reports, ThinkLink data TCAP, TCAP Writing Assessment, ELDA, 4Sight, ThinkLink, and DIBELS data Documented attendance at grade level meetings, CDDRE results from 4Sight and walk-throughs, documented attendance at PTA meetings, professional development evaluations Parent involvement in TSIPP process, parent volunteers as TCAP proctors, recognizing AYP benchmarks, school newsletters,

Title parent involvement programs, Family Reading nights

Evidence of effectiveness or ineffectiveness (State in terms of quantifiable improvement) Improvement in TCAP CRT NCE scores from the 2006 to 2007:

Reading/Language 47 to 49; Math 53 to 56; Social Studies 48 to 51; and Science 47 to 59

Improvement in TVAAS scores from 2006 to 2007: Reading/Language 2.5 to 4.8; Social Studies 3.6 to 4.8; Science 0.4 to 3.2

Increase in number of students meeting or exceeding AYP (+4%) Reading/Language 83% to 87% (2-Yr average); Math (+3) 89% to 92% (2 Yr average)

At-risk students have been identified for interventions and extra help.

Grade levels are consistently pacing their curriculum when no curriculum map is in place.

 

DIBELS 2007-2008 Kinder-garten

Aug. 29%,

Dec. 55%

1st grade Aug. 62%, Dec. 64%

TCAP Subgroups African American, Hispanic, and Students with Disabilities saw an increase in Advanced, whereas All Students, White, and Economi-cally Disadvan-taged saw a slight decrease or remain unchanged.

4Sight results show an overall increase from the baseline test to test four of: Reading/

Language 51.52% to 58.86%, Math 59% to 71.08%.

Improvement in TCAP CRT NCE scores from the 2006 to 2007:

Reading/Lang-uage 47 to 49; Math 53 to 56; Social Studies 48 to 51; and Science 47 to 59

 

Increased use of literacy book room while acknowledging there is a need for lower leveled books

Effective small and large group instruction in the area of literacy

District literacy requirements for portfolios and running records

Formative assessments are being used effectively to drive differentiated instruction.

 

Title professional development funds provided Comp training for all teachers to address instructional styles and classroom management techniques.

School-wide QUILT training reinforced more effective questioning techniques to improve the rigor of the curriculum.

PLC issues addressed in grade level meetings.

Documented communication between school and home as evidenced by school website and parent newsletters

Family centered programs and activities presented on a regular basis with increased parental attendance

Evidence of equitable school support for this practice Access to Tennessee State Standards through website

Distribution of Blueprint for Learning

Professional development in which all teachers viewed and printed their CRT reporting categories and state performance

categories

TCAP results

District website available to all teachers to view curriculum maps

K-2 grade level literacy requirements were distributed by literacy leader.

Analysis of TCAP and TVAAS data to assess achievement of AYP benchmarks

DIBELS results are reviewed in order to determine at-risk and benchmark students.

ThinkLink mastery of skills is reviewed by appropriate teachers.

4Sight data is reviewed to determine mastery and non-mastery of tested skills.

Bookroom is available to all faculty and staff with training provided by literacy leader. Professional development is provided for teachers, enabling them to view and print their testing data. Professional development activities focus on Professional Learning Communities.

CDDRE walk- throughs and documented instructional strategies are reviewed by the CDDRE team and presented to all teachers at grade level meetings.

Riverside’s Adopt-a- School partner donates materials used by all teachers and students each year.

 

Next Step (changes or continuations) Continued use of Blueprint for Learning

Professional development for new teachers in the area of Tennessee State Standards

Lesson plans align with state standards (SPI)

 

 

Pacing guides for those grades where no curriculum map is in place.

Vertical articulation between grade levels to reduce duplication of studies

Use staff development and grade level meeting times to prioritize objectives

 

 

Professional develop-ment for DIBELS implementa-tion and strategies for at-risk students

 

 

 

Allocate more bookroom materials for emerging readers

Variation of teaching styles to include manipulatives and more student centered activities

Time allotted for vertical articulation between grade levels to discuss writing portfolios

 

Continued professional development for all teachers to analyze testing data

Writing needs to become a priority because our TCAP Writing scores continue to remain below the county and state scores

Training provided to develop Professional Learning Communities within the school

Provide staff and professional development to assist in implementa-tion of PLCs

Continuation of programs that involve parents and students: Family Reading Night, Parent Workshops, and Parent Days

Student achievement goals are clearly communicated to parents and stakeholders.

TEMPLATE 3.1.b: Curriculum Gap Analysis

Setting priorities is one way to narrow a school’s improvement focus. As we know, we have more needs than we have resources. Priority needs can be identified through a Gap Analysis. The process will identify the discrepancy, or the gap, between the current state – "What Is" –which is identified in your practices – and the desired future state – "What Ought To Be" – which is found in the rubric. Completing Template 3.1.b (the gap analysis) should help school team members discover "What Ought To Be."

Completion of the gap analysis should enable the School Leadership Team to answer the equity and adequacy questions relative to curricular practices, also to be recorded in Template 3.1.b.

Template 3.1.b: Curriculum Gap Analysis

Curriculum Gap Analysis - Narrative Response Required
"What is" The Current Use of: TIME, MONEY, PERSONNEL And OTHER RESOURCES

(How are we currently allocating our time, money, personnel and other resources and building capacity around understanding and implementing high quality curricular practices?)

TIME

Faculty and staff use the Blueprint for Learning and district curriculum mapping to plan lessons and address curriculum needs. Riverside is currently aware of the need for rigor in curriculum and instruction to align with formative assessments through our training with Center for Data-Driven Reform for Education, in cooperation with our district’s partnership with John Hopkins University. Encouraging faculty to share successful curriculum planning with peers upon evaluation of data from formative assessments and their individual components. Staff development analyzing assessment data to address curriculum gaps. Strategic Planning Committee meets to determine internal curricular and other professional development needs for the school as it relates to district mandates. Steering Committee meets with the Elementary Supervisor of Instruction and Accountability Facilitator in order to ensure school is in adherence with School Improvement Plan. Literacy block allows approximately 120 minutes for literacy instruction for grades one through five and approximately 60 minutes for kindergarten. Title I and ELL are pull-out programs for at-risk students, who work in a small group setting for 30-60 minutes daily.

MONEY

Funds from our central office meet the needs of a variety of categories such as instructional equipment, office supplies, and library supplies/materials. A portion of the General Purpose Funds was allocated to fund the ThinkLink on-line testing program, which is utilized by grades two through five. Riverside is reimbursed from the district a percentage of workbook fees for students on free or reduced lunch. Basic Educational Program (BEP) funds are used to provide instructional/curricular materials for classrooms, special education, music, physical education, and art teachers and also to each grade level. PTA annually provides funds for teachers and paraprofessionals to purchase materials and supplies in order to enhance the curriculum. Through fund-raising efforts, they purchase instructional materials and supplies.

A minimum of two book fairs are held each school year in order to provide reading material to both students and staff with a percentage of the sales used for school materials and supplies.

Title I and Title IIA funds are used for professional development activities which provide training to enable teachers to teach and address the needs of students with different learning styles and special learning needs. Funds are also used to provide training on parent involvement, technology and on using data and assessments to improve classroom practice and student learning. Title V funds are used to purchase materials for the Literacy Resource/Book Room to be used in our Literacy Programs. Burger King receipts are collected and redeemed for a 15% cash donation to the school, which is used for literacy and math materials. Title IID provides professional development for technology. This helps to ensure that all teachers are up to date on Tennessee State Standards. Round-Up for Technology, a service provided by Columbia Power and Water System, is a program where interested stakeholders may round-up their utility bill, with the overage being used for technology at Riverside. The Preschool program is funded through state lottery funds.

PERSONNEL

Title I funding provides salaries for four teachers and four paraprofessionals; instructional materials, supplies and staff development. A literacy leader is available twice per week to faculty and staff in order to disseminate information from the Title lab and literacy team.

Technology administrator is available once per week to facilitate effective computer programs and training to support the curriculum. An inclusion special education teacher and assistant use instructional time to engage individual students, both proficient and non-proficient, in all aspects of the required curriculum.

OTHER RESOURCES

Vulcan Materials Company has adopted our school and provides us with supplies and materials to enhance our curriculum and instruction. Staff, parents, and community donate memorial books to the library that are available to all students. First Farmers and Merchants Bank donated funds for supplies to be used in all classrooms. United Givers Fund provides funding for students in need. These funds provide for items such as glasses, recorders, school supplies, workbooks, and clothes. Riverside’s involvement with Burger King allows teachers, parents, and students to collect receipts on assigned days during a specific time period. A percentage of sales is given to the school to be used to purchase AR books, AM materials, and literacy materials and supplies. Eastern Star Chapter 287, Barnes and Noble, Office Max, First Baptist Church, and McDonalds also provide school supplies.

"What Ought to Be" – How Should we be Using Our: TIME, MONEY, PERSONNEL And OTHER RESOURCES

(How should we be allocating our time, money, personnel and other resources and building capacity around understanding and implementing high quality curricular practices?)

TIME

Monthly faculty meetings should address curricular needs in all grade levels. Time for horizontal and vertical articulation should occur during the school day. Increased time should focus on the rigor of curriculum and student achievement. Additional time needs to be spent on professional development, focusing on curriculum. Adequate training must be provided for new hires and non-tenured teachers.

MONEY

Riverside teachers need to better utilize funds allocated for professional development, conferences, and seminars. Our school needs an additional administrative position, as well as

increased funds for materials, supplies, equipment, and additional intervention programs for students not meeting AYP. Also needed are alternative programs provided for students who disrupt and interfere with instruction. With our growing Hispanic population, additional training for teachers is needed in strategies that increase English language proficiency.

Money from district and/or school funds should be used to purchase new items for our Literacy bookroom, the school library, and classroom libraries to improve alignment to the curriculum.

PERSONNEL

Paraprofessionals should work with students labeled at risk during school-wide literacy

block. Riverside should provide training for staff in the areas of differentiated instruction to assist in meeting the individualized needs of students.

OTHER RESOURCES

Pacing guides should be completed for those grades without curriculum maps to ensure alignment with performance standards. Pacing guides should be user-friendly and accessible to all teachers. Intervention kits purchased by the county need to be in a centralized location in order to be easily accessed by all teachers. Since paraprofessionals have been trained to administer the DIBELS assessment, other responsibilities should be prioritized to better address the needs of our at-risk population.

Equity and Adequacy:

Are we providing equity and adequacy to all of our teachers?

The Special Education self-contained classroom has a teacher who must create her own planning time. Many times, teachers face difficulty with adequate planning time because of scheduling conflicts, additional school responsibilities, and lack of communication. We face a dilemma at our school with an equitable allocation of classroom resources because we have a targeted assistance federal program instead of a school-wide program.

Are we targeting funds and resources effectively to meet the needs of all of our teachers in being effective with all their students?

Staff development money is being used effectively in providing Professional Development which targets curriculum. Additional funding and resources are needed to meet the needs of our at-risk students in order to meet NCLB requirements.

Substitutes make the difference in whether students achieve their daily objectives when classroom teachers are absent. Therefore, because of the importance of meeting continually rising AYP goals each year, the school/district need to provide training for each candidate. This is as important as the fingerprint and background check.

 

Based on the data, are we accurately meeting the needs of all students in our school?

The subgroups All Students, African American, White, and Economically Disadvantage met the NCLB mandate of 83% Proficient/Advanced in Reading/Language Plus Writing. The subgroups All Students, African American, Hispanic, White, and Economically Disadvantaged met the NCLB mandate of 79% Proficient/Advanced in Math. While our Percentage Proficient/Advanced 2 Year Average increased for several subgroups, the All Students, African American, White, Economically Disadvantaged, and Students with Disabilities performed below the State % Proficient/Advanced 2 Year Average in Reading/Language. Although scores in the Advanced category have increased, the prior-achievement subgroups appear to indicate that students in their performance level are not achieving at desired levels. Performance indicates that attention is being focused on the lower levels perhaps due to the nature of proficiency. A gap on performance gain appears to exist for middle to higher achieving students.

 

TEMPLATE 3.1.c: Curricular Summary Questions

The following summary questions are related to curriculum. They are designed as a culminating activity for your self-analysis, focus questions discussions, and findings, regarding this area.

Template 3.1.c: Curricular Summary Questions

(Rubric Indicator 3.2)

Curriculum Summary Questions- Narrative Response Required
What are our major strengths and how do we know?

Staff development through the Title I program provides many opportunities for curriculum development and Tennessee State Standards.

Parental involvement and community support are an important part of our school make-up. There are many opportunities for parents and community members to become an active part of our school. Riverside hosts family reading nights, school wide read-in days, newsletters, Title involvement programs, and parent and community surveys.

The mentoring program, implemented by the district, allows time for Lead Mentors to share experiences, knowledge gained through teaching experiences, and help ensure that new hires and non-tenured teachers know how to access the State Curriculum Standards through the state website.

A stable school structure exists due to teachers who have many years experience with the Tennessee State curriculum.

 

Curriculum Summary Questions- Narrative Response Required
What are our major challenges and how do we know. (These should be stated as curricular practice challenges identified in the templates above, that could be a cause of the prioritized needs identified in component 1.)

The district has implemented curriculum mapping. However, not all grades are as current as others. Therefore, there is a need for pacing guides. The weekly grade level meetings should be used to facilitate the planning and pacing of the curriculum.

Common planning times allow for weekly grade level meetings. However, there is no time allotted for vertical articulation. Research has shown that teachers working with the grade level below and above, students are more successful, and there is a reduction in repetition of thematic studies between grade levels

Bookroom materials are limited by too few lower level books. Having more selections would enhance and strengthen small group instruction.

Through CDDRE walk-throughs, it has been found that too many lessons are teacher directed and not student centered. Riverside is not using differentiated instruction effectively, and the results are reflected in our Reading/Language scores. The subgroups All Students, African American, White, Economically Disadvantaged, and Students with Disabilities all performed below the State Percentage Proficient/Advanced 2 Year Average.

Riverside has implemented Professional Learning Communities. However, not all teachers and/or grade levels are using the program to their advantage. Grade levels meet weekly to outline the curriculum. Nevertheless, the teachers are not always determining what the students need to learn, how the teachers will know if the students have learned, or what the teachers will do if the students do not learn.

Riverside continues to focus on writing; however, there is not enough conferencing between teachers and students. Students will not improve writing skills if they are not continuously directed. This could be a reason that TCAP Writing Assessment Scores for 5th grade remains at 3.8, and Riverside continues to score below the county and state scores.

Curriculum Summary Questions- Narrative Response Required
How will we address our challenges?

Challenges will be addressed through collaborative planning that will include administration, teachers, staff, and other various stakeholders.

Teachers will meet to align the curriculum with State Standards and work as a grade level in order to pace the curriculum. Teachers will use the Blueprint for Learning as a guide to ensure that all State Standards are taught.

Administration and teachers will ensure that schedules allow time for both horizontal articulation and vertical articulation. This could be during the regular school day, by providing half day substitutes, or using professional development hours.

A portion of our fundraising profits will be used to add books to our literacy bookroom. Teachers, along with our Literacy Coach, will use monies allotted to purchase lower leveled books.

Professional Learning Communities need to be fully implemented by all teachers.

CDDRE will continue with walk-throughs focusing on rigor of curriculum and instruction.

District requirements are in place for writing. Grade levels will use rubrics to assess student writing. This will ensure that the teacher knows the amount of progress each student is making. By conferencing individually, the teachers will be able to communicate to the student their strengths and weaknesses.

 

 

 

 

 

 

TEMPLATE 3.2.a: Instructional Practices

Template 3.2.a: Instructional Practices

(Rubric Indicators 3.3 and 3.4)

 

Current Instructional Practices

Balanced

Literacy

Technology Integration

Standard Based Instruction

Data Driven Instruction

Differentiated

Instruction

Research Based Instruction

Classroom Management

Evidence of Practice (State in definitive/tangible terms) Literacy

Coaches

Leveled

Reading Book Room

Small Group Instruction

Implementation of Daily 5

Cooperative

learning

groups

 

Running

Records

DIBELS

Internet Access in classrooms

Microsoft

Office available on each computer

School Computer Lab

Math Lab

 

 

TN Standards-Blueprint for Learning

 

TCAP assessment and

TVAAS data to drive individual and group needs

CDDRE data to assess students’

needs and teachers’ strengths and weaknesses throughout the year

4-Sight data to assess students’ needs throughout the year

ThinkLink data

DIBELS

Running Records

The use of formative and summative classroom assessment throughout the year to address instructional needs

 

One week intersession tutoring opportunities in the spring and fall

Inclusion of resource students within their regular classroom environment

Research based approaches to address various learning styles

Integration of cross curricular activities

Small Group Instruction

Implementa-tion of Daily 5

Cooperative

learning

groups

Data Driven Instruction

Various teaching approaches

Standards based curriculum

 

Access to classroom management approaches (ex. Harry Wong/ Lee Canter)

Beginning collaborative effort among staff by brainstorming various approaches

Professional development opportunities to strengthen classroom management techniques

 

Is the current practice research-based? Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Is it a principle & practice of high-performing schools? Yes

Characteristics of High-Performing Schools

Yes

Characteristics of High-Performing Schools

Yes

Characteristics of High-Performing Schools

Yes

Effective

Schools, Common Practices-12 ingredients of success from Tennessee’s most effective schools

Yes

Characteristics of High-Performing Schools

Yes

Characteristics of High-Performing Schools

Yes

Effective

Schools, Common Practices-12 ingredients of success from Tennessee’s most effective schools

Has the current practice been effective or ineffective? Effective Effective Effective Effective Effective Effective Effective
What data source(s) do you have that support your answer? (identify all applicable sources) TCAP results

CDDRE results

Running records

DIBELS testing

Teacher Observation

TCAP results CDDRE data

Increase in promotion numbers

Increased student achievement

(state assessments)

AYP performance increase

TCAP results

CDDRE data

Inclusion program in works for resource students

Principal observations

TCAP results

CDDRE data

Teacher lesson plans indicate usage of modifications to reach various learning styles

TCAP results

CDDRE data

Principal observations reflect use of research based planning and implementa-tion

Principal Observations

School discipline records

Teacher discipline journals

Evidence of effectiveness or ineffectiveness (State in terms of quantifiable improvement) Academic Growth (Value Added)

Riverside’s 2007 mean gains in Reading/Lan-guage, Science and Social Studies increased from 2006. Mean gains for these subjects exceeded the 2005 State Growth Standard. The mean gain for Math decreased from 4.9 to 3.7. However, mean gains for all subjects exceeded the 2007 State Growth Standard, and Riverside received a status of (A) for all subjects.

Fourth Grade saw 3-Yr Average gains exceed the State 3-Yr Average gain in Reading/Lang-uage, Math, and Social Studies. The 3-Yr Average gain in Science was higher than the State Growth Standard but not quite at the State 3-Yr Average gain.

Academic Growth (Value Added)

Riverside’s 2007 mean gains in Reading/Lan-guage, Science and Social Studies increased from 2006. Mean gains for these subjects exceeded the 2005 State Growth Standard. The mean gain for Math decreased from 4.9 to 3.7. However, mean gains for all subjects exceeded the 2007 State Growth Standard, and Riverside received a status of (A) for all subjects.

Fourth Grade saw 3-Yr Average gains exceed the State 3-Yr Average gain in Reading/Lang-uage, Math, and Social Studies. The 3-Yr Average gain in Science was higher than the State Growth Standard but not quite at the State 3-Yr Average gain.

Academic Growth (Value Added)

Riverside’s 2007 mean gains in Reading/Lan-guage, Science and Social Studies increased from 2006. Mean gains for these subjects exceeded the 2005 State Growth Standard. The mean gain for Math decreased from 4.9 to 3.7. However, mean gains for all subjects exceeded the 2007 State Growth Standard, and Riverside received a status of (A) for all subjects.

Fourth Grade saw 3-Yr Average gains exceed the State 3-Yr Average gain in Reading/Lang-uage, Math, and Social Studies. The 3-Yr Average gain in Science was higher than the State Growth Standard but not quite at the State 3-Yr Average gain.

Academic Growth (Value Added)

Riverside’s 2007 mean gains in Reading/Lan-guage, Science and Social Studies increased from 2006. Mean gains for these subjects exceeded the 2005 State Growth Standard. The mean gain for Math decreased from 4.9 to 3.7. However, mean gains for all subjects exceeded the 2007 State Growth Standard, and Riverside received a status of (A) for all subjects.

Fourth Grade saw 3-Yr Average gains exceed the State 3-Yr Average gain in Reading/Lang-uage, Math, and Social Studies. The 3-Yr Average gain in Science was higher than the State Growth Standard but not quite at the State 3-Yr Average gain.

Academic Growth (Value Added)

Riverside’s 2007 mean gains in Reading/Lan-guage, Science and Social Studies increased from 2006. Mean gains for these subjects exceeded the 2005 State Growth Standard. The mean gain for Math decreased from 4.9 to 3.7. However, mean gains for all subjects exceeded the 2007 State Growth Standard, and Riverside received a status of (A) for all subjects.

Fourth Grade saw 3-Yr Average gains exceed the State 3-Yr Average gain in Reading/Lang-uage, Math, and Social Studies. The 3-Yr Average gain in Science was higher than the State Growth Standard but not quite at the State 3-Yr Average gain.

Academic Growth (Value Added)

Riverside’s 2007 mean gains in Reading/Lan-guage, Science and Social Studies increased from 2006. Mean gains for these subjects exceeded the 2005 State Growth Standard. The mean gain for Math decreased from 4.9 to 3.7. However, mean gains for all subjects exceeded the 2007 State Growth Standard, and Riverside received a status of (A) for all subjects.

Fourth Grade saw 3-Yr Average gains exceed the State 3-Yr Average gain in Reading/Lang-uage, Math, and Social Studies. The 3-Yr Average gain in Science was higher than the State Growth Standard but not quite at the State 3-Yr Average gain.

Academic Growth (Value Added)

Riverside’s 2007 mean gains in Reading/Lan-guage, Science and Social Studies increased from 2006. Mean gains for these subjects exceeded the 2005 State Growth Standard. The mean gain for Math decreased from 4.9 to 3.7. However, mean gains for all subjects exceeded the 2007 State Growth Standard, and Riverside received a status of (A) for all subjects.

Fourth Grade saw 3-Yr Average gains exceed the State 3-Yr Average gain in Reading/Lang-uage, Math, and Social Studies. The 3-Yr Average gain in Science was higher than the State Growth Standard but not quite at the State 3-Yr Average gain.

Evidence of equitable school support for this practice Increase in student achievement

Multiple professional development

opportunities

QUILT training

COMP training

Computer Lab scheduling

Principal encourages all teachers in order to address the integration of technology in and outside the regular classroom setting.

Professional development for all teachers on using technology to better analyze data and drive the rigor of instruction

Principal observations are done to ensure teachers are addressing all state mandated standards. Principal observation notes conclude that teachers are using data to direct small group instruction.

Performance increase in AYP

Multiple professional development

opportunities

QUILT training

COMP training

Increase in the inclusion of special needs students in the regular classroom

Principal observation notes indicate an abundance of researched based approaches to address various learning disabilities and styles

Multiple professional development

opportunities

QUILT training

COMP training

Principal observation notes conclude teachers reflect research based strategies

Multiple professional development

opportunities

QUILT training

COMP training

Low number of classroom disruptions referred to principal’s office
Next Step (changes or continuations) Continue a balanced literacy program

Continue assessment practices;

DIBELS,

4Sight, and

ThinkLink

to assess progress in areas of literacy

Continue to have technology professional development training

More training to analyze computer data is needed to ensure all teachers can access information in a timely manner.

Integrate technology into Instructional

Teachers will continue to use the TN Blueprint

Teachers will be trained to access the TCAP Achievement Criterion Reference Test Reporting Categories with specific State Performance indicators.

Teachers will continue to adequately be supplied with various data throughout the school year. This will include TCAP results from previous years, DIBELS testing, 4Sight

testing, and ThinkLink results.

Teachers will continue to have professional development on how to utilize small group instruction. This will not only bring the low students to proficiency but propel the proficient into the advanced category. Teachers will continue to have research based materials available to them through Title resources, as well as county professional development. Teachers will be able to view their co-workers in order to gain a broader insight into classroom management styles.

TEMPLATE 3.2.b: Instructional Gap Analysis

Setting priorities is one way to narrow a school’s improvement focus. As we know, we have more needs than we have resources. Priority needs can be identified through a Gap Analysis. The process will identify the discrepancy, or the gap, between the current state – "What Is" –which is identified in your practices – and the desired future state – "What Ought To Be" – which is found in the rubric. Completing Template 3.2.b (the gap analysis) should help school team members discover "What Ought To Be."

Completion of the gap analysis should enable the School Leadership Team to answer the equity and adequacy questions relative to instructional practices, also to be recorded in Template 3.2.b.

Template 3.2.b: Instructional Gap Analysis

Instructional Gap Analysis - Narrative Response Required
"What is" The Current Use of: TIME, MONEY, PERSONNEL And OTHER RESOURCES

(How are we currently allocating our time, money, personnel and other resources and building capacity around understanding and implementing high quality instructional practices?)

TIME

Riverside has approximately two hours each day in grades 1-5 designed for literacy. The kindergarten literacy block is split into two seventy-five minute blocks with an activity period between blocks. Required weekly grade level meetings minutes are kept. Title I and various other pullouts, like resource, speech and ELL, result in students in all grades being pulled from the regular classroom throughout the day. Staff development activities occur before school starts in the fall. There are occasions in which substitutes are used for teachers to meet during the school day.

 

MONEY

Title I funds Riverside’s Targeted Assistance Program. Title I also funds most of our professional development activities. BEP money is used for various classroom materials and supplies. BEP 2.0 money is used for instructional improvement for literacy and math. Title II money is available for professional development activities and materials. Riverside’s PTA annually provides teacher allocations to support classroom instruction. Burger King weekly receipt collection provides a steady pool of money to support literacy and math initiatives.

PERSONNEL

Limited inclusion in one lower and one upper grade classroom is being piloted this year for the first time. Riverside’s Title 1 Targeted Assistance Program employs four teachers and four assistants which provide highly qualified instruction for at-risk students. One half-time literacy coach is assigned to our school.

 

OTHER RESOURCES

Public Education Foundations provide competitive mini-grants for innovative teaching ideas.

Teachers write grants to enhance instructional practices.

"What Ought to Be" – How Should we be Using Our: TIME, MONEY, PERSONNEL And OTHER RESOURCES

(How should we be allocating our time, money, personnel and other resources and building capacity around understanding and implementing high quality instructional practices?)

TIME

All grade levels, including kindergarten, should have an uninterrupted literacy block of at least one and a half to two hours. A majority of our faculty has voted for our school to become a School-wide Title I program; however, not a two-thirds majority. If the next vote determines that we will be a School-wide Title I school, more flexibility will be given to more effectively provide for student instructional time. After school in-service hours will provide more instructional improvement focus time.

MONEY

Better use of Title I funds can be utilized if after school professional development opportunities are provided. Site based planning for decision making should occur both before the school year starts and throughout the school year.

PERSONNEL

Becoming Title I school-wide could restructure our school to provide more instructional planning and supervision, resulting in improved instructional strategies. An assistant principal is included for Riverside in the county budget for the 2008-2009 school year. This will provide more instructional leadership in crucial areas. Increased inclusion opportunities will provide more rigor and relevance for those students labeled at-risk.

OTHER RESOURCES

If Riverside becomes a school-wide Title 1 program, Title I funds can be utilized to purchase additional reading books and materials for all students.

Equity and Adequacy:

Are we providing equity and adequacy to all of our teachers?

Teachers are provided with equitable funds, staff support, up-to-date instructional practices, and researched based data.

 

Are we targeting funds and resources effectively to meet the needs of all of our teachers in being effective with all their students?

Based upon the amount of professional development, funds are adequately distributed to meet the instructional needs of all teachers. Title funds are limited because Riverside has opted not to go to a school-wide Title I program. If the decision was made to change to school-wide, more funds would be used to benefit the instructional needs of all students.

Based on the data, are we accurately meeting the needs of all students in our school?

Using the data provided in earlier sections of this document, it can be stated that Riverside has made tremendous strides to ensure that all students’ needs are being met. There are still key areas of concern with writing scores not meeting state standards and various subgroups currently not meeting state mandated curriculum standards.

 

TEMPLATE 3.2.c: Instructional Summary Questions

The following summary questions are related to instruction. They are designed as a culminating activity for your self-analysis, focus questions discussions, and findings, regarding this area.

Template 3.2.c: Instructional Summary Questions

(Rubric Indicator 3.4)

Instructional Summary Questions- Narrative Response Required
What are our major strengths and how do we know?

At Riverside, each classroom teacher is equipped with the Tennessee standards and has had technology training in accessing this information using the TN Department of Education website. These curriculum standards are then applied to daily lesson plans. Many, if not all grade levels meet regularly to plan. These meetings occur at a minimum of once a week and allow a collaborative network of ideas and creative brainstorming.

Classroom teachers are equipped, in grades four and five, with TCAP scores for all students at the beginning of each school year. This information is used to formulate a learning plan to meet each individual student’s strengths and weaknesses. Throughout the year, teachers assess students’ learning using other various assessments. These include ThinkLink and 4-Sight assessments in grades two though five. The advantages of these assessments are that each teacher is given a snapshot of their students’ achievement levels at a given time at specific intervals throughout the school year. In the primary grades, kindergarten and first grade are given literacy and fluency reading assessments. DIBELS and running records are examples of these. These assessments are used to effectively direct future instruction.

After professional development on various teaching strategies, students are actively engaged in high quality learning environments supported by higher ordered thinking skills. Students are encouraged to analyze and dissect literature and poetry in literacy circles. In these groups, they brainstorm and share ideas and the purpose for literature. Teachers create lesson plans that engage questions and answers. These lessons require students to synthesize prior information and apply new concepts in order to experience educational success. The teacher takes on a facilitating role and becomes an educational guide in the process, prompting students to achieve the desired learning expectation. Teachers also use a multi-sensory approach in planning, with various approaches to ensure that all students reach educational benchmarks. Each lesson incorporates a variety of visual, auditory, tactile, and kinesthetic approaches.

Students are provided with opportunities to receive additional assistance to improve their learning beyond the initial classroom instruction. All teachers are available during the regular instruction time to conference in small groups. One on one instructional help is available at various times to give specific attention to student needs. Riverside is equipped with a Title I reading program that services students in need from kindergarten through grade 5. Title I math is offered to needy students in grades three through five. Riverside has an after school tutoring program that is available for one hour and fifteen minute sessions. We are fortunate to be a school in Maury County that is on a balanced schedule system. With two week breaks every nine weeks, students are able to attend a week of remediation during the fall and spring intercessions. Special education classes are transitioning from a pull out program to an inclusion setting. This also provides resource students with the opportunity to stay with their peers and receive tutoring and individualized help from the resource teacher in their regular classroom setting.

Classroom organization and management techniques support the learning process. Using the classroom management techniques of Harry Wong and Lee Canter, teachers are encouraged to use both positive and negative reinforcements to ensure a learning environment that is effective. These techniques allow school time to be used for instructional process rather than disciplinary problems.

 

 

Instructional Summary Questions- Narrative Response Required
What are our major challenges and how do we know. (These should be stated as instructional practice challenges identified in the templates above, that could be a cause of the prioritized needs identified in component 1.)

As a learning community, each teacher needs to implement writing into various subjects. The TCAP Writing score for 5th grade remains at 3.8. Riverside continues to score below the county and state scores. More emphasis needs to be given school-wide in writing to improve the scores. Even though Riverside’s CRT NCE scores have increased, they were below the state scores in reading, math, science, and social studies. Therefore, Riverside needs to continue to raise scores in all subjects. This requires more students being moved from Proficient to Advanced. Creative learning environments help students advance into the next scoring category. Our weaknesses fall in the area of lecture and worksheet mania. To quote Marcia Tate’s book, Worksheets Don’t Grow Dendrites, "Exemplary teachers have always known that active engagement of students is not a luxury but a necessity if students are to truly acquire and retain content, not only for tests, but for life."(xi) Although lecture has its place in the educational process, other creative instructional procedures must support that lecture in order to ensure that each student is engaged in the learning process. Creative lesson plans support the multiple learning styles which exist within each classroom and should be heavily incorporated to support the times that lecture is necessary. Although scores in the Advanced category have increased, the prior-achievement subgroups appear to indicate that students in this performance level are not achieving at desired levels. Performance indicates that attention is being focused on the lower levels perhaps due to the nature of proficiency. A gap in performance gain appears to exist for middle to higher achieving students.

Currently, Riverside Elementary has implemented an inclusion program for students with disabilities in both the higher and lower grades. This is a step in the right direction to ensure that all students have an opportunity to receive instruction in an environment surrounded by their peers. Riverside has made improvement in this area; however, this needs to be expanded to fully gain the benefit to all special needs students. This should address the increase in the number of students that scored Below Proficient in the special needs subgroup.

 

Instructional Summary Questions- Narrative Response Required
How will we address our challenges?

To address the challenges at Riverside, there are four key areas of concern: writing, advancing to proficiency of students with disabilities, the economically disadvantaged, and other subgroups. To effectively address our challenges, teachers need the opportunity to view other professionals in various grade levels. This will enable each teacher to gain access to a wide range of teaching styles without tremendous cost to the county.

TEMPLATE 3.3.a: Assessment Practices

Template 3.3.a: Assessment Practices

(Rubric Indicators 3.5 and 3.6)

 

Current Assessment Practices

Assessments are aligned with TDOE Standards Based Curriculum

Appropriate assessments guide decisions regarding student achievement

All categories (subgroups) of students are assessed

Various types of assessments are used including: CRT, NRT, portfolios, etc.

Appropriate professional development in the area of assessment

Continuous training and technical support in development and use of assessment

Communication of student learning to parents and other appropriate stakeholders regarding assessment

Evidence of Practice (State in definitive/tangible terms) TCAP test given once a year in the spring to grades 3-5

This achievement test is a timed, multiple choice assessment that measures skills in Reading, Language Arts, Mathematics, Science and Social Studies.

TCAP Writing Assessment

4Sight is given 3 times per year in grades 3-5.

ThinkLink is given twice a year in grades 2-5.

ELDA is given once a year to ELL students in grades K-5.

TCAP Writing Assessment given to 5th graders in February is a

35-minute narrative written by 5th graders and given a score of 0-6 following the state rubric

4Sight test given 3 times per year in grades 3-5

Benchmark assessment tool that enables you to predict your students’ reading and mathematics achievement multiple times throughout the year

ThinkLink test given twice a year in grades 2-5

ThinkLink assesses student progress toward meeting state standards for reading/lang-uage arts and mathematics to provide teachers the prediction of mastery.

 

TCAP shows AYP. This includes students with disabilities.

4Sight is an indicator for AYP.

ELDA test given once a year for K-5

ELDA is designed to measure annual progress in English language proficiency among ELL students in grades K-5.

Chapter tests (used in upper grades), end of unit tests (used in upper grades), teacher observation, portfolios, running records

Chapter testing measures benchmarks in shorter intervals to fine tune the curriculum

 

DIBELS given 3 times a year in order to determine the amount of progress made and/or interventions needed

DIBELS administered to all students in grade K-1

DIBELS training provided to all kindergarten and first grade teachers

Specialty teachers and parapro-fessionals have been trained to administer DIBELS.

Teachers in

3rd – 5th grades were trained to disaggregate 4Sight data.

Teachers in grades 2-5 received off-site ThinkLink training to interpret student test data.

School Administrator shared TCAP AYP results from 2006/2007 school year with faculty in order to address which subgroups were meeting AYP and those at risk.

Riverside has a team of five CDDRE members, including an administrator and four teachers, who have off site training periodically to evaluate student data, promote rigor of the curriculum, and address needs of at-risk students for the current school year.

 

CDDRE Facilitators share contact information via email, phone, and technical support through John Hopkins University.

TCAP data is inserted in student report cards and sent home to parents/care-givers for their review.

School shares helpful suggestions, with both students and parents, in order to prepare students for upcoming tests

 

 

Is the current practice research-based? Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Is it a principle & practice of high-performing schools? Yes

Used District- Wide

Characteristic of High Performing Schools

Effective school, Common Practice-12 ingredients of success from Tennessee’s most effective schools

Yes

Used District-Wide

Characteristic of High Performing Schools

Effective school, Common Practice-12 ingredients of success from Tennessee’s most effective schools

Yes

Characteristic of High Performing Schools

Effective school, Common Practice-12 ingredients of success from Tennessee’s most effective schools

Yes

Characteristic of High Performing Schools

Effective school, Common Practice-12 ingredients of success from Tennessee’s most effective schools

Yes

Characteristic of High Performing Schools

Effective school, Common Practice-12 ingredients of success from Tennessee’s most effective schools

Yes

Characteristic of High Performing Schools

Effective school, Common Practice-12 ingredients of success from Tennessee’s most effective schools

Yes

Characteristic of High Performing Schools

Effective school, Common Practice-12 ingredients of success from Tennessee’s most effective schools

Has the current practice been effective or ineffective? TCAP is effective in grades 3-5.

TCAP Writing Assessment is effective in 5th grade.

TCAP is effective in grade 3-5.

4Sight is effective in grades 3-5.

ThinkLink is effective in grades 2-5.

ELDA is effective in grades K-5.

4Sight is effective in grades 3-5.

TCAP is effective in grades 3-5.

DIBELS is

effective in grades K-1.

Chapter Test and End of Unit Test are effective in the upper grades.

Portfolios and Running Records are used in the lower grades and have proven to be quite effective.

DIBELS is effective in grades K-1, with 2nd grade accessing the data for student placement.

4Sight is effective for grades 3-5.

ThinkLink is effective for grades 2-5.

 

Effective Effective for English readers (Website and written communication is not user friendly for non-English speaking students, parents, and stakeholders)
What data source(s) do you have that support your answer? (identify all applicable sources) TCAP, TVAAS, CRT, TSIPP, AYP, DIBELS, School/District and State report cards, system-made report cards Writing Assessment results

ThinkLink and 4Sight results

TCAP, AYP, ELDA results

4Sight results

DIBELS reports showing those students at intensive, strategic, and benchmark levels

Reports on student progress shown through teacher made assessments, end of unit testing, and chapter tests

Minutes are taken at in-service and committee meetings with sign-in sheets kept on file

and copies sent to central office.

The 4Sight

reports are viewed, discussed, and shared with all colleagues. Reports are printed and distributed to teachers in grades 3-5.

The school website is accessible to parents, students, and community stakeholders. Information is only available in English. This limits our steadily increasing Hispanic population.
Evidence of effectiveness or ineffectiveness (State in terms of quantifiable improvement) Improvement in TCAP from the 2006-2007 school-year

Improvement displayed on the State Report Card

Improvement in TVAAS scores

 

TCAP Writing Assessment is an effective tool in assessing students’ needs regarding writing skills.

4Sight effectiveness is yet to be determined, due to this being the first year of imple-mentation. There is no prior data to compare.

ThinkLink gives measurable statistics. This helps the teacher to direct upcoming instruction.

ThinkLink is used in 3rd grade and with repeating 2nd graders for placement in Title I program.

 

ELDA shows progression of acquisition in English. It reflects scores in language arts, math, science, and social studies. DIBELS shows measurable statistics on what child knows.

DIBELS is used in 1st grade for placement in Title I program

DIBELS measures Initial Sound Fluency (ISF), Letter Naming Fluency (LNF), Phoneme Segmentation Fluency (PSF), Nonsense Word Fluency (NWF), and Oral Reading Fluency (ORF).

Classroom assessments are used to show what students have learned and where students need remediation.

Classroom teachers are available to continue teaching while specialty teachers and parapro-fessionals administer DIBELS test.

ThinkLink assessment data has proven to be beneficial in determining the assessments needed, evidenced by state TCAP results.

CDDRE walk-throughs and documented instructional strategies are reviewed by our CDDRE team and presented to all teachers. Teachers are then able to determine the necessary assessments needed in order to determine at-risk students. Through the distribution of newsletters; all students, parents, and community stakeholders informed of assessment dates

School Website is only effective with English speakers and readers.

Evidence of equitable school support for this practice Access to Tennessee State Standards through website

Classroom instruction is based on state standards.

Our 3 year average NCE gain for the 4th grade was higher in the areas of Reading/Lang-uage Arts (2.3 higher), Math (3.0 higher), and Social Studies (3.6 higher).

Our 3 year average NCE gain for the 5th grade was higher in the areas of Reading/Lang-uage Arts (1.3 higher), Math (0.8 higher), and Science (3.0 higher).

The subgroups All Students, White, African American and Economically Disadvantaged met the NCLB mandate of 83% Proficient/

Advanced in Reading/

Language Arts Plus Writing.

The subgroups All Students, African American, Hispanic, White, and Economically Disadvantaged met the NCLB mandate of 79% Proficient/Advanced in Math.

TCAP Writing Assessment is given to all students in the 5th , 8th , and 11th grade to show students’ growth in Language Arts.

Our gain on a 3 year average NCE gain for the 4th grade was higher in the area in the Language Arts (2.3 higher than the state). The 5th grade was higher in the area of Language Arts (1.3 higher than the state).

4Sight is given to all students in grades 3-5. 4Sight helps guide the teacher on individual student needs in the areas of Mathematics and Language Arts/Reading.

 

ThinkLink is

given to all students in grades 2-5.

It provides the teacher prediction of mastery, proficiency, and adequate yearly progress (AYP) that is critical to monitoring student progress toward state mandated goals.

 

4Sight is given to all students in grades 3-5.

4Sight helps guide the teacher on individual student needs in the areas of Mathematics and Language Arts/Reading.

ELDA is given to ELL students in grades K-2 as an inventory and in grades

3-5 as an academic test.

36% were Pre-Functional, 29% were Lower Intermediate, 18% were Upper-Intermediate, 14% were Advanced, 3% were Fully English

 

DIBELS is given to all students in grades K-1.

The teacher uses assessment results to check each child’s mastery of benchmarks in order to better drive instruction.

Our growth in kindergarten for this school year shows a growth in mastery of benchmarks in by 25%.

The growth in 1st grade for this school year shows a growth in students who are established in Phoneme Segmentation Fluency by 23%.

Required professional development for all teachers in order to determine our assessment needs and strengths

Professional Development provided in which all reporting teachers were able to view and print their testing data

CDDRE walk-throughs and documented instructional strategies are reviewed by our CDDRE team and presented to all teachers at grade level meetings. All teachers, students, parents, and community stakeholders are given copies of newsletters.

Those students, parents, and community stakeholders with internet access are able to view the school website.

Next Step (changes or continuations) Continue administering TCAP and analyzing TCAP data and results

 

Continue with TCAP Writing Assessment

Teachers will use district- provided rubrics to score weekly and

monthly writing assessments and then conference with students to set expectations.

 

Continue with 4Sight and pass along results to next grade, prior to next school year, to help plan students’ individualized education for the upcoming year

Using the ELDA data, teachers will monitor the progression of ELL students over several years.

Use TCAP assessment results to individualize student’s education plan

Continue with Think Link to help guide curriculum

2nd grade should be tested on DIBELS to help fine tune curriculum.

The DIBELS assessment data will drive the teacher’s instruction.

We will continue using specialty teachers and paraprofess-ionals for DIBELS testing.

Specialty teachers and paraprofess-ional will also be trained to provide interventions for at-risk students. This will help all students be successful on state, district, and teacher- made assessments.

Continuation of the CDDRE walk-throughs and relaying observations notes to all teachers

 

School will make website more user friendly for non-English speaking families.

TEMPLATE 3.3.b: Assessment Gap Analysis

Setting priorities is one way to narrow a school’s improvement focus. As we know, we have more needs than we have resources. Priority needs can be identified through a Gap Analysis. The process will identify the discrepancy, or the gap, between the current state – "What Is" –Which is identified in your practices and – and the desired future state – "What Ought To Be" – which is found in the rubric. Completing Template 3.3.b (the gap analysis) should help school team members discover "What Ought To Be."

Completion of the gap analysis should enable the School Leadership Team to answer the equity and adequacy questions relative to assessment practices, also to be recorded in Template 3.3.b.

Template 3.3.b: Assessment Gap Analysis

Assessment Gap Analysis – Narrative Response Required
"What is" The Current Use of: TIME, MONEY, PERSONNEL And OTHER RESOURCES

(How are we currently allocating our time, money, personnel and other resources and building capacity around understanding and implementing high quality assessment practices?)

TIME

Time for administering assessments is wisely used. TCAP is given annually in the spring with the results returning to school soon after the beginning of the next school year. The assessment is given over a four-day period in the morning when students are at their peak, with a fifth day available for make-up testing of absent students. ELDA is given in small group settings to all ELL students in the spring, in addition to TCAP. It assesses their progress with the English language in areas of language arts, mathematics, science, and social studies. DIBELS and 4Sight assessments are administered three times each year to assess students’ proficiency levels. Best instructional practices are then determined based on this information. ThinkLink is administered three times a year, in grades two through five, to address the needs of those students. ThinkLink, 4Sight, and classroom testing results are returned to the teachers in efficient and timely manners. Assessment results help teachers and students evaluate and prepare for the TCAP.

MONEY

The money allocated for assessment is being used on highly-effective, research-based testing that helps prepare students to meet the benchmarks necessary to be successful in the next grade. Administrators are careful in researching each assessment that is implemented to make sure it aligns with the curriculum, and that the results received give necessary information to improve instruction. Statewide testing, TCAP and ELDA, is purchased by state funds that are set aside for that purpose. DIBELS and ThinkLink are funded through district funds. 4Sight is funded by a grant to the district from CDDRE, in partnership with John Hopkins University.

PERSONNEL

Personnel are utilized as efficiently as possible. The specialty teachers (Art, P.E., Music, Library, and Guidance) and paraprofessionals administer the DIBELS assessment to kindergarten and first grades so general education teachers may continue teaching while testing occurs. During TCAP, all teachers in grades three through five and paraprofessionals are used as administrators or proctors of the test, in addition to securing as many parents, grandparents, and community volunteers as possible to help as test proctors. ELDA is given by the ELL teachers with a proctor. ThinkLink and 4Sight are administered by classroom teachers.

OTHER RESOURCES

Parents, retired teachers, PTA officers, and community leaders are recruited to help proctor the TCAP testing. Parent volunteers are used to facilitate DIBELS testing by monitoring and retrieving students.

Grace Thomas, CDRRE liaison, provides on-site training in walk-throughs (to address the issue of rigor in our curriculum as it relates to assessment). She and Betty Latture have trained CDDRE team members in accessing 4Sight data in our computer lab as it relates to TCAP assessment benchmarks.

"What Ought to Be" – How Should we be Using Our: TIME, MONEY, PERSONNEL And OTHER RESOURCES

(How should we be allocating our time, money, personnel and other resources and building capacity around understanding and implementing high quality assessment practices?)

TIME

The county should look at the window of time allotted for particular assessments and set dates that will benefit all students. This school should then determine the time of day in which the assessments will occur.

Some students tire easily when testing becomes long and could possibly lower the assessment results. Assessments, such as the TCAP, need to be given at an earlier time in the school year. By giving TCAP so close to the end of the school, students may not perform at their best level.

MONEY

Riverside should better utilize professional development monies by providing substitutes while teachers analyze assessment data. Money could benefit the teachers more if testing was kept to a minimum and the extra money used to enhance the classroom with programs or extra personnel, lowering the class size and helping the students with the highest need.

PERSONNEL

School personnel would benefit from additional professional development on ways to use assessment results to maximize efforts in helping the students reach state benchmarks.

Paraprofessionals could be used more effectively by working with students individually and in small intervention groups.

Currently, four or more teachers may share one paraprofessional. This limits the time that each teacher is able to have the paraprofessional in their classroom to work with at-risk students.

OTHER RESOURCES

Parents and community members could be better utilized by helping to administer both state and county mandated assessments.

Equity and Adequacy:

Are we providing equity and adequacy to all of our teachers?

Many teachers face difficulties with adequate planning time because of scheduling conflicts, additional school responsibilities, and lack of communication. There is a dilemma at our school with an equitable allocation of classroom resources because Riverside has a targeted assistance federal program instead of a school-wide program.

Are we targeting funds and resources effectively to meet the needs of all of our teachers in being effective with all their students?

Staff development money is being used effectively in providing professional development which targets assessment. However, with the new standards and benchmark levels, additional funding and resources will be needed to meet the needs of our at-risk students in order to meet these NCLB requirements.

When classroom teachers are absent, substitutes make the difference in whether students achieve their daily objectives. Therefore, because of the importance of meeting continually rising AYP goals each year, school/district training needs to be provided for each substitute. This is as important as the fingerprint and background check.

Based on the data, are we accurately meeting the needs of all students in our school?

The subgroups All Students, African American, White, and Economically Disadvantage met the NCLB mandate of 83% Proficient/Advanced in Reading/Language Plus Writing. The subgroups All Students, African American, Hispanic, White, and Economically Disadvantaged met the NCLB mandate of 79% Proficient/Advanced in Math. While our State Percentage Proficient/Advanced 2 year Average increased for several subgroups, the All Students, African American, White, Economically Disadvantaged, and Students with Disabilities performed below the State Percentage Proficient/Advanced 2 Year Average in Reading/Language.

Although scores in the advanced category have increased, the prior-achievement subgroups appear to indicate that students in their performance level are not achieving at desired levels. Performance indicates that attention is being focused on the lower levels perhaps due to the nature of proficiency. A gap on performance gains appears to exist for middle to higher achieving students.

 

TEMPLATE 3.3.c: Assessment Summary Questions

The following summary questions are related to assessment. They are designed as a culminating activity for your self-analysis, focus questions discussions, and findings, regarding this area.

Template 3.3.c: Assessment Summary Questions

(Rubric Indicator 3.6)

Assessment Summary Questions- Narrative Response Required
What are our major strengths and how do we know?

Testing is done on a timely basis and use the information to guide our curriculum that will in turn, will improve assessment results. Money is set aside for assessments that will provide the teachers with results that show student strengths and areas of need. The county test results are returned in a timely manner and teachers use the data to drive instruction, to assess the rigor of the curriculum, and to reteach when necessary.

 

Assessment Summary Questions- Narrative Response Required
What are our major challenges and how do we know. (These should be stated as assessment practice challenges identified in the templates above, that could be a cause of the prioritized needs identified in component 1.)

The school’s major challenge is that state testing results cannot be accessed in a timely manner and must be used for the following school year in order to guide the curriculum. Pre-K through grade two teachers are given district assessments to use for instructional guidance. Riverside should constantly re-evaluate the type, number, and frequency of all assessments given to Riverside students. It is a challenge to finding enough parents and community leaders to help proctor the assessments.

Assessment Summary Questions- Narrative Response Required
How will we address our challenges?

The school must become proactive in using the results as soon as possible. Students’ test data must follow them from year to year. Vertical articulation must be implemented in order for teachers to evaluate current students’ benchmarks as well as addressing the needs of their upcoming students. Riverside needs to establish a call list to get proctors involved in the school’s assessments prior to testing time.

TEMPLATE 3.4.a: Organizational Practices

Template 3.4.a: Organizational Practices

(Rubric Indicators 3.7and 3.8)

Current Organizational Practices

Defined Purpose and Direction Through Mission, Visions & Beliefs

Supporting Increased Opportunities for Teaching and

Learning Success

Students’

Effective Time on Task

Continual Professional Development For School Leaders

Addressing Issues That Impede Teaching and Learning

Supporting a Diverse Community Through Programs and Practices

Engaging Parents

And Community Through Extended Learning Opportunities

Evidence of Practice (State in definitive/tangible terms) Riverside’s mission and beliefs are three- fold: academics, community, and self discipline.

The organizational practices are established to support these three areas of the students’ lives.

Mission and vision statements are posted throughout the school and in each classroom.

During scheduled planning times, grade level teachers meet weekly to evaluate lessons plans to ensure alignment with state standards set for their grades.

By sharing lesson ideas, techniques, and activities, the teachers are able to establish goals and skills, as well as determining which have been mastered and which have not been mastered.

 

Bi-monthly and called faculty meetings provide a time to collaborate on important issues, such as curriculum, teaching strategies, and major issues. Agendas are handed out at the beginning of each meeting and placed in the teacher handbook.

Emails are frequently sent to the faculty concerning questions and/or concerns that need to be handled immediately before a scheduled meeting.

Professional articles, websites, and contacts are shared through the email system.

Collaborative networking allows ideas, common goals and desires, as well as the needs of all students to be targeted and met.

Literacy coaches direct and support teachers. Individual time is given to discuss standards, data collection, and techniques that could increase and ensure success.

Meeting minutes are recorded during scheduled block times as needed. Emails and memo contacts are placed in files at teacher’s discretion.

Mentors help establish deep roots in the educational process, as well as to encourage and support one another. Times are established on an individual and need basis.

Committees are formed through an equal evaluation of professional backgrounds and knowledge. This ensures that goals are met for specifically targeted areas, such as, but not limited to, TSIPP, academic, and other school-related committees.

Professional development logs are kept to record meeting times and dates. Teachers who have attended various workshops or seminars share techniques, information, and ideas during planned, or called, faculty meetings.

The meeting agenda provides ample space to record notes as needed. These meetings offer an opportunity to improve or develop new plans for school-wide improvement.

Organiza-tional practices and processes promote effective time on task for all students.

Students have scheduled block times that help to ensure that goals and strategies are met.

Through a designated literacy block, students are assured a specific time frame dedicated to the success of reading and literacy. This ensures uninter-rupted quality instructional time.

 

Students who qualify for resource pull-out receive designated small group instructional blocks that focus on a specific learning task.

The library is available during a scheduled time in the morning to allow students to "swap" AR books and encourage them to excel in goals set by themselves and their teacher.

Classroom teachers have the opportunity to schedule a time in the computer lab to ensure all students access to technology.

Specialty classes, such as Art, Music, Guidance, PE, and Library are scheduled the same time, on different days of the week, to establish and maintain consistency throughout the day.

Riverside provides relevant professional development for all faculty as indicated by the variety of professional development opportunities available.

School-wide professional development is provided on topics that impact the entire faculty: i.e., Quilt Training, COMP Training, RTI informational sessions, CDDRE, and Crisis Management.

Professional development is provided on specialized topics relevant to grade levels, subjects, or needs of students: CPR, First aid, Daily 5, technology, and Developmental Reading Assessment (DRA).

Centerstone is an organization that focuses on recovery and resiliency issues in order to achieve each individual’s best outcome.

When a child’s learning is hindered by social or emotional needs, referrals can be and are made to our on- site

Centerstone representa-tive. Together with the classroom teacher, goals are set and one-on-one attention is given to the student in need.

We have an on-site school psychologist and guidance counselor who are available to assist if any social/emo-tional needs arise.

Working together as a network provides our school with many advantages in addressing our students’ needs.

Riverside supports a diverse learning community through many programs and practices.

During the school year, teachers pinpoint and assess students who would benefit, and are in need of, the additional services offered. Through our Title I pull-out program, both in Reading (K – 5) and Math (3rd – 5th), students receive small group instruction, as well as basic support.

Speech and Language services are available to all eligible children in pre-k through grade five. For students with special needs, a resource pull-out is offered, as well as a full-day CDC room.

Spanish-speaking students receive small group and one- on-one instruction from the ELL teacher(s), as well as support from our educational assistants.

Riverside Elementary strives to maintain and improve community relationships.

A monthly newsletter informs parents of upcoming events in the school and offers opportunities for parents to volunteer.

There are many different areas that the parents, other family members, and the community may become involved.

At the beginning of the school year, each grade level hosts a Parent Orientation. This informs parents of teachers’ expectations and encourages parent involvement.

Conferences, held at the end of each nine weeks grading period, develop and improve parent/teacher communi-cation and involvement in the students’ educational processes.

 

Family Reading Night is one of Riverside’s most important parent involvement activities. Prior to each PTA meeting, parents join their child to encourage and support reading and AR testing.

Literacy activities, such as The Singing Cowboy and visits from well-known story tellers/authors, provide parents and students the experience of reading together.

Powerful Partners in Reading, a program funded through a grant from the Target Corporation, provides a Pre-k classroom with take-home learning backpacks. The backpacks contain a book, manipulatives, and activity cards for the caregiver to complete with their child.

Classroom teachers offer extra reading materials and activities to parents who are willing to participate.

Is the current practice research-based? Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Is it a principle & practice of high-performing schools? Yes

Effective schools, common practices-12 ingredients of success of TN’s most effective schools

Yes

Characteristics of high performing schools

Yes

Effective schools, common practices-12 ingredients of success of TN’s most effective schools

Yes Characteristics of high performing schools Yes

90-90-90 schools

Yes

Characteristics of high performing schools

Yes

Characteristics of high performing schools

Has the current practice been effective or ineffective? The current practice has been very effective for Riverside students, faculty, and staff as indicated by the success of students. Effective in grade levels that are meeting on a weekly basis, as well as receiving input from fellow colleagues, such as literacy coaches and mentors

Effective for staff through email accounts and faculty notebooks

Effective

in student behavioral expectations throughout scheduled block times

Effective in establishing AR growth noted in diagnostic growth reports and goals set

Effective

as indicated by the implementation of strategies, programs, management, and instructional techniques

Effective

Social and or emotional needs, modeled through whole classroom visits, as well as addressed on an individual need basis

Effective when individual academic small group pull-out is received Effective when opportunities are accepted by families and caregivers

Different types of communi-cation, such as web pages, newsletters, or daily agendas, are effective.

Effective when learning opportunities are provided for interested caregivers

What data source(s) do you have that support your answer? (identify all applicable sources) Summative assessments demonstrate that students are learning.

Parents, faculty, staff, and students feel safe and comfortable as a part of the Riverside learning community.

Riverside students continue to have discipline and independence to move forward in their educational processes and success.

Minutes, references, and materials are kept in faculty notebooks. Literacy portfolios, AR folders/

diagnostic reports, behavioral logs, student goals in specialty classes

Professional development is followed by an evaluation to provide feedback on the quality and relevance of the activity.

Attendees also complete an Action Plan in which goals are set, a time frame is established, and for which accountability can be monitored.

Student social/

emotional referral files

Parental Communica-tion folders/logs

Diagnostic reports

Title I parent involvement, Family Reading Nights, school newsletters, parental involvement in TSIPP process, and TCAP proctors
Evidence of effectiveness or ineffectiveness (State in terms of quantifiable improvement) Riverside values diversity in all aspects of education, and instills the value that all people are valuable in a community.

Riverside’s goal to produce responsible citizens is a high priority for the faculty and staff.

Therefore,

95% of the faculty has been trained in the Love in a Big World curriculum, and 100% of the student body is participating in the program. The program is new to Riverside this year, and data will be collected to determine its effectiveness.

This character education will serve the students of Riverside long after they have left. Riverside feels that it is important for our students to know and understand discipline and independence.

Approximately 25% of the faculty participates in PLC. For PLC to be effective at Riverside, more faculty and staff will need to participate in a variety of PLC.

The professional development offered has been implemented successfully and is benefiting Riverside as indicated by the percentage of students meeting or exceeding AYP benchmarks.

COMP Training for 100% of the faculty during the 2006-2007 school-year, provided through Title I and II funds, addresses classroom management techniques, as well as instructional styles. Currently, 16% of the faculty needs training.

The number of office referrals has decreased to 73 during the current school year. The number of students sent to the alternative school has remained consistent between the 2006-2007 and 2007-2008 school years.

100% of students in K-5th grade have the capability to participate in Accelerated Reader. Teachers have access to diagnostic reports that track each student’s progress.

Increased test scores, as indicated by the percentage of students meeting or exceeding AYP benchmarks, are increasing annually, and AYP goals have been met by all tested grades.

43% of primary grades are implementing the Daily 5 program.

100% of the faculty has been trained in the school-wide crisis management drills.

78% of the student body receives free or reduced meals at school. Riverside provided safety and stability for the 19% transient population of the school. Winter coats were given to students in need. TCAP Subgroups African American, Hispanic, and Students with Disabilities saw an increase in Advanced, where All Students, White, and Economically Disadvantaged saw a slight decrease or remained unchanged. Family Reading Night in conjunction with PTA meetings; Joel Reese, Singing Cowboy; Ronda Todd in conjunction with Parents’ Day; Harry Bliss in conjunction with Grandparents’ Day; Hop on Pop Day for dads and grandfathers in conjunction with Dr. Seuss Week

Documented commun-ication between home and Title I classes

 

Evidence of equitable school support for this practice Riverside has created a school community that reflects the diverse student body.

Students can see themselves in school leaders, teachers, parents, visitors, and guest speakers.

Riverside values diversity in all aspects of education, and instills the value that all people are valuable in a community.

Faculty notebooks, email accounts, and allotted block time for grade level meetings Scheduled literacy blocks and designated small instructional blocks Educational practices, crisis management, and continuous professional development benefit all students.

Ruby Payne’s professional development has helped teachers understand and meet the needs of the diverse socio- economical population.

Scheduled classroom visits for Centerstone counselor as well as private consultation times.

Additional classroom presences due to absence of school guidance counselor

Scheduled pullout times.

Reserved classroom space for Title, ELL, and Speech

Family and community scheduled events

Communica-tion avenues established between parents and teachers through websites, newsletters, conferences, and daily agendas.

Organized, extended -learning opportunities and materials are provided on an individual basis through Title programs and Powerful Partners in Reading.

Next Step (changes or continuations) Consistent discipline is an area the majority of the faculty has named as a place for improvement.

Guided by the information gathered, new and revised organization practices can be implemented to make this a strength for the school.

Continuation of professional development in the area of Tennessee State Standards

Use of grade level meeting times to determine prioritized objectives and curriculum based decisions

Provide new teachers, as well as non-tenured teachers, with mentors

Continua-tion through established block and specialty times on a consistent basis Continuation through professional

development opportunities pertaining to strategies for at- risk students

Professional development will continue to be an important part of the organizational practices at Riverside.

More professional development opportunities in best practices

Continuation through professional development opportunities pertaining to strategies for at-risk students Continuation of home/school communica-tion, such as programs involving parents and students

Clear communica-tion in reference to student goals and achievements

Organized, extended- learning opportunities through individual teachers/class-rooms, and Title I parent involvement

 

TEMPLATE 3.4.b: Organizational Gap Analysis

Setting priorities is one way to narrow a school’s improvement focus. As we know, we have more needs than we have resources. Priority needs can be identified through a Gap Analysis. The process will identify the discrepancy, or the gap, between the current state – "What Is" –which is identified in your practices – and the desired future state – "What Ought To Be" – which is found in the rubric. Completing Template 3.4.b (the gap analysis) should help school team members discover "What Ought To Be."

Completion of the gap analysis should enable the School Leadership Team to answer the equity and adequacy questions relative to organizational practices, also to be recorded in Template 3.4.b.

Template 3.4.b: Organizational Gap Analysis

Organizational Gap Analysis – Narrative Response Required
"What is" The Current Use of: TIME, MONEY, PERSONNEL And OTHER RESOURCES

(How are we currently allocating our time, money, personnel and other resources and building capacity around understanding and implementing high quality organizational practices?)

TIME

The Blueprint for Learning and district curriculum mapping are used by the faculty and staff to organize lesson plans and address curriculum needs. Teachers utilize assessment data to focus on and address individual student achievement through grade-level meetings, PLC, collaborative networking, pursuing classroom organizational skills, grade-level shared planning, and professional development experiences. Time is spent on-task by utilizing pacing guides, daily literacy blocks, and through the balanced school schedule. The needs of the diverse community of learners are met by allocating time for pull-out programs such as ELL and Special Education. During the 2006-2007 school year, twenty-six scheduled opportunities for professional development were offered to Riverside teachers and staff. These times, totaling over 181 hours, support teaching and learning success.

MONEY

Maury County Board of Education provides funds to meet organizational needs including, but not limited to, office supplies, library materials and supplies, and instructional equipment.

Diverse student needs are also met through a percentage of workbook waiver fees for those

classified as free and reduced lunch. Basic Educational Program (BEP) funds provide instructional and curricular classroom materials. Title IIA funds provide a variety of professional development opportunities, as well as involve parents and community through programs and workshops. Funds are allocated for meeting the needs of the diverse learning population through programs such as ELL, Special Education, and small group instructional pullout.

PERSONNEL

Principal-led monthly faculty meetings maintain effective communication between administration, faculty, and staff. Title I funds provide four paraprofessionals in the Title I program classrooms. Lottery funds provide an additional two full-time classroom assistants in the Pre-K classrooms. Grade level paraprofessionals support the diverse community of learners by providing additional one-on- one or small group instruction for struggling students, as well as offer classroom teachers support. Four additional faculty members, also provided through Title I funds, allow for small group instructional opportunities in math and reading. Faculty and staff facilitate the Family Reading Nights held before PTA meetings, where families are encouraged to come and read together at school. Literacy leaders provide organizational support during grade level meetings, as well as professional development opportunities to ensure student achievement and success.

OTHER RESOURCES

United Givers Fund provides on-going support in the areas of school supplies, workbooks, clothes, and glasses. Classroom teachers received funds from First Farmers and Merchants Bank to be utilized in classroom organizational supplies and other materials. Riverside’s involvement with Burger King allows teachers, parents, and students to collect receipts on a given date and time. A percentage of the total sales, given to the school, is used to purchase Accelerated Reader books, as well as teacher materials. Powerful Partners in Reading, an organized extended family learning grant, was funded by the Target Corporation. Our Adopt-a-School partner, Vulcan Materials Company, provides needed support for organized family and school events.

"What Ought to Be" – How Should we be Using Our: TIME, MONEY, PERSONNEL And OTHER RESOURCES

(How should we be allocating our time, money, personnel and other resources and building capacity around understanding and implementing high quality organizational practices?)

TIME

Monthly scheduled faculty meetings should allow time to collaborate between grade levels, as well as to address curricular needs in all grade levels. Time during the day should be provided for vertical articulation and during called faculty meetings.

MONEY

Funding needs to be provided for adequate, updated training of existing staff, in addition to new staff. Better utilization of funding for off-campus professional development, seminars, and conferences should be pursued. Alternative programs for students who interfere or disrupt instructional time are needed.

PERSONNEL

Properly trained paraprofessionals to work with at-risk students is necessary for the success of students.

OTHER RESOURCES

There is a need to invest in more family and community based programs, such as monthly volunteer

readers.

Equity and Adequacy:

Are we providing equity and adequacy to all of our teachers?

Relevant professional development is offered to all faculty members throughout each school year. Funds provide adequate opportunities for additional professional development in specific areas of need. Consistent follow-up with COMP training for all new staff members is a concern.

Are we targeting funds and resources effectively to meet the needs of all of our teachers in being effective with all their students?

Professional learning communities and vertical articulation at Riverside is initiated by individuals rather than supported by the entire school community. With a school-wide Title program, teachers would receive resources and support necessary to work toward improving both PLCs and vertical articulation.

Based on the data, are we accurately meeting the needs of all students in our school?

As reported by NCLB the subgroups All Students, African American, White, and Economically Disadvantaged met the mandate of 83% Proficient/Advanced in Reading/Language Plus Writing.

The subgroups All Students, African American, Hispanic, White, and Economically Disadvantaged met the NCLB mandate of 79% Proficient/Advanced in Math. The student body, although having shown growth and improvement, still falls short of the state average. Resources from school-wide Title I federal assistance funds could aide in the organization of more targeted at-risk students gaining individual and small group instructional time in the general educational classroom, thereby closing the performance gap that exists for middle and higher-achieving students.

 

 

TEMPLATE 3.4.c: Organization Summary Questions

The following summary questions are related to organization. They are designed as a culminating activity for your self-analysis, focus questions discussions, and findings, regarding this area.

Template 3.4.c: Organization Summary Questions

(Rubric Indicator 3.8)

Organization Summary Questions- Narrative Response Required
What are our major strengths and how do we know?

Riverside is committed to improving student achievement. Teachers and staff have a common mission and goal-student success. The TSIPP committee members of component 3 have assessed, along with stakeholder input, the current organizational process and practices to identify our strengths and weaknesses.

STRENGTHS

During common planning time, grade level teachers meet weekly to evaluate lessons and plan to align with state standards set for their grade. By sharing lesson ideas, techniques, and activities, the teachers are able to establish goals and skills, as well as determine which have been mastered and which have not. Minutes are recorded and kept for documentation and future references. The desired outcome is to provide a support system for both students and teachers, to ensure academic success across the curriculum.

Bi-monthly and called faculty meetings provide a time to collaborate on important issues, such as curriculum, teaching strategies, and major issues. Agendas are handed out at the beginning of each meeting and placed in the teacher handbook. Emails are frequently sent out to the faculty as a whole to ensure information is correct and updated. Questions and/or concerns that need to be handled immediately, before a scheduled meeting, are relayed quickly to insure quality communication among everyone. Professional articles, websites and contacts are also shared through the email system.

Collaborative Networking allows ideas, common goals and desires, as well as the needs of all students to be targeted and met. One literacy coach was provided to direct and support teachers in the classroom. Individual time is given to discuss standards, data collection and techniques that could increase and ensure success. Minutes are recorded during weekly grade-level meetings. Emails, memos, and contact information are placed in files at teacher’s discretion. Mentors are put in place to help establish deep roots in the educational process as well as to encourage and support one another. Committees are formed through an equal evaluation of professional backgrounds and knowledge to ensure goals are met for specifically targeted areas- such as, but not limited to TSIPP and Action Plan Committees. Professional development logs are kept to record meeting times and dates. Teachers who have attended various workshops or seminars are given opportunities to share techniques, information and ideas during planned or called faculty meetings. The meeting agenda provides ample space to record notes as needed. These meetings provide an opportunity to improve or develop new plans for school-wide improvement.

 

 

 

 

 

Organization Summary Questions- Narrative Response Required
What are our major challenges and how do we know. (These should be stated as organizational practice challenges identified in the templates above, that could be a cause of the prioritized needs identified in component

Through a teacher-directed survey, areas of challenges were discovered along with the needs and desire to meet each of them. Although attempts and strides are being made for these processes to be carried out, collaborative efforts and ideas are noted and stated to change these challenges into strengths of our organizational process as a whole.

1.) Vertical Articulation

2.) Professional Learning Communities

Organization Summary Questions- Narrative Response Required
How will we address our challenges?

Vertical Articulation

Vertical Articulation provides important information about students/curriculum strengths and weakness to coordinating grade levels. Using the information from a student’s previous year to ensure success in their current year is vital to meeting the established goals and standards, as is noting future expectations and desires. Maintaining consistent portfolios will provide a needed insight of each student’s academic snap shot. Allowing collaboration between grade levels during called faculty meetings provides equal opportunity for sharing needs, concerns and successes as well as strategies and goals that need to be addressed as a team.

Professional Learning Communities

There are many levels of academic training and knowledge on the Riverside staff. Everyone has different skills and insights that provide new strategies and ideas that can be related to different learning types throughout the school. Professional Learning Communities provide sharing opportunities that have potential to spark new ideas and interest across all grade levels. Providing a monthly scheduled collaboration time, with a specified topic to be determined at a previous faculty meeting or email memo, will begin the professional development process drawn from our own faculty members, as well as identify mentors and in-house experts for different strategies, challenges and goals. Notes, references, and materials will be placed in the teacher handbook for assessable training material.

 

Component 4 – Action Plan Development

TEMPLATE 4.1: Goals (Based on the prioritized goal targets developed in Component 1.)

Describe your goal and identify which need(s) it addresses. The findings in Component 1 should drive the goal statements. How does this goal connect to your system’s five year or systemwide plan?

(Rubric Indicator 4.1)

 

TEMPLATE 4.2: Action Steps (Based on the challenges/next steps identified in Component 3 which focus on curricular, instructional, assessment and organizational practices.)

Descriptively list the action you plan to take to ensure that you will be able to progress toward your prioritized goal targets. The action steps are strategies and interventions, and should be based on scientifically based research where possible. Professional Development, Parent/Community Involvement, Technology and Communication strategies are to be included within the action steps of each goal statement.

(Rubric Indicator 4.2)

 

TEMPLATE 4.3: Implementation Plan

For each of the Action Steps you list, give the timeline for the step, the person(s) responsible for the step, the projected cost(s), funding sources and the evaluation strategy.

(Rubric Indicator 4.3)

 

 

GOAL 1 – Action Plan Development

Template 4.1 (Rubric Indicator 4.1) Revised _March, 2011_______________________

Section A –Describe your goal and identify which need(s) it addresses. (Remember that your previous components identified the strengths and challenges/needs.)

Goal

·1 The percentage of students scoring Proficient/Advanced in Reading/Language in grades 3-4 will increase as follows to meet or exceed NCLB benchmarks:

All Students- 5% by 2012

African American- 6% by 2012

Hispanic- 6% by 2012

Economically Disadvantaged- 5% by 2012

Students with Disabilities- 5% by 2012

·2 The percentage of students in each subgroup and overall for Reading/Language and Math will increase 5% from the Proficient to the Advanced performance level by 2012.

·3 Students in K-2 will demonstrate success on developmentally appropriate measures.

Which need(s) does this Goal address?

The goal addresses the Reading/Language Arts curricular, instructional, organizational, and assessment needs, as well as the AYP requirements.

How is this Goal linked to the system’s Five-Year Plan?

TSCPP, adopted by the MCBOE as its 5-year Strategic Plan, states that all students will meet or exceed NCLB benchmarks. This aligns with the SBOE Master Plan.

ACTION STEPS – Template 4.2 (Rubric Indicator 4.2)

IMPLEMENTATION PLAN – Template 4.3 (Rubric Indicator 4.3)

Section C – For each of the Action Steps you list, give timeline, person(s) responsible, projected cost(s)/required resources, funding sources, evaluation strategy and performance results/outcomes. (For Evaluation Strategy, define how you will evaluate the action step.)

Timeline

Person(s) Responsible

Required Resources

Projected Cost(s) & Funding Sources

Evaluation Strategy

Performance Results / Outcomes

Action Step 1.1

Teachers will analyze test scores and compile lists to identify at-risk students and plan interventions.

PD: Teachers will receive professional development/release time for planning to meet needs of at-risk students. Increase collaboration school-wide and county-wide.

TECH: Refresh teachers on use of websites for data analysis to implement technology to be able to increase TCAP scores by 2011. Training will include special education websites, desegregation of test scores, and additional teacher needs.

PI: Parents will be informed of their child’s progress and given an explanation of how they can work with their child at home.

Aug. 2011

Oct. 2011, Jan. 2012, Mar. 2012

Principal

School-wide Facilitator

Literacy Coach

K-4

Teachers

Cara Skaggs

(RVAS)

Assessment notebooks and materials

 

Substitutes

 

 

 

Ink and Paper for Printing Assessment Results

Computer Lab

Laser Color Printer/cartridges

$500.00

School Federal Funds

 

$4000.00

Title II and Federal Funds

 

2,000.00 School Federal Funds

$2,500.00 School Federal Funds

Prepared lists of at-risk students, interventions aligned by subject and grade level

Lesson Plans

Walkthroughs

Minutes from Weekly Grade Level Meetings

Running Records/DRA/Rigby Assessments

Student Portfolios

Aug. 2011 – Teachers prepared lists of at-risk students via TCAP scores, Spring 2011 ThinkLink, running records, kdg screening, math pre tests.

Assessments are on-going throughout the year. Lesson plans indicate teachers planning interventions and students working with Title Tutors.

 

 

Action Step 1.2

The school will provide a minimum of ninety-minute daily literacy block in grades Kindergarten through fourth with an additional 60 minutes throughout the day.

Comm: The school will inform parents and the community of the importance and benefits of the literacy block in the student handbook.

PI/CI: Parents and community will be invited for a Parents’ Day that will include a walkthrough during the literacy block.

PD: One faculty meeting per month is to be used to allow vertical articulation and collaboration for sharing needs, concerns, and successes, as well as strategies and goals that need to be addressed as a PLC.

August 2011-May 2012

 

Principal

School-wide Facilitator

Literacy Coach

All Teachers

All
Educational Assistants

Office Personnel

Classroom Literacy Materials/

Supplies

Classroom libraries, listening centers, etc.

Leveled Books

Student Handbook

Refreshments and Materials for Parent Workshop

$30,000.00

School Federal Funds

Burger King Fund

BEP Money

Riverside General Inst.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$100.00 School Federal Funds

Classroom Schedules


Lesson Plans

Walkthroughs

Minutes from Weekly Grade Level Meetings

Parent survey to gain input from parents and community leaders.

Faculty Survey

Classroom schedules are on file in the office and with the facilitator. Grandparents and

Parents Day – Sept. 9.

Minutes from weekly grade level meetings and monthly Principal/Grade Level meetings on file with facilitator

Action Step 1.3

Teachers will integrate reading in all content areas.

PD: The Literacy Leader will provide PD in integrating reading strategies in all content areas.

TECH: Technology equipment will be purchased to enhance reading instruction through the content areas.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PD: Technology Training

PI: Parents will receive information about healthy eating habits and tips for helping their child maintain a healthy weight. Healthy eating practices will be presented during Literacy Night.

August 2011-May 2012

 

Principal

Literacy Leader

Facilitator

All Teachers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

School Health Team

Non-fiction leveled readers

Non-fiction periodicals

 

 

 

 

 

document cameras, LCD projectors, computers, whiteboards, other computer hardware for support

Library media software such as Safari Montage, united streaming, etc.

Professional Development Release Time

$20,000.00 School Federal Funds

3,000.00 School Federal Funds

 

$15,000.00

 

 

 

 

$8,000.00

BEP Money

Burger King Fund

Riverside General Inst.

 

 

 

 

Lesson Plans

Walkthroughs

Student Assessment Results

Literacy Room Checkout Report

A schedule is in place for each grade level for Professional Dev. release time.

Scholastic News has been purchased for grades 1, 3, 4 and Weekly Reader for grade 2; Non-fiction readers have been ordered for all 3rd grade classroom libraries.

A Promethean Board & projector has been installed in the literacy room for PD use. Safari Montage has been renews for this school year and is used daily in classrooms.

TECH: Two new computers to replace to out-dated in Title Classroom.

Promethean Boards for music room and 2 sp. Ed. classrooms added. 4 new computers added to math lab and 2 new computers replaced 2 non-working computers in title tutor

Classroom.

.

Action Step 1.4

Teachers will engage students in guided, shared, independent, and modeled Reading/Writing activities.


PD: The Literacy Leader will conduct professional book studies as needed to meet instructional needs. The Literacy Coach will provide targeted professional development on instructional strategies, such as using guided reading, developing classroom libraries, purposeful classroom environments, and authentic reading and writing to improve student achievement. The School-Wide Facilitator will inform teachers of district level and state level professional development opportunities.

P/CI: The parents and community will be able to participate in Reading and Writing Workshops. The parents will receive monthly literacy newsletters (such as Home/School Connections, Early Years, and Reading Connections).

August 2011 – May 2012

(on a daily basis through-out the year)

Principal

School-wide Facilitator

Literacy Coach

PreK-4

Teachers

Instructional Materials

Library Books

Books for Professional Book Studies

Literacy Newsletters

Professional Development Conferences

 

Substitutes

Instructional Equipment (such as book racks, shelves, and tables etc.)

Refreshments and Materials for Parent Workshop

$1700.00 Gen. Purpose funds

$4,000.00 School Federal Funds

$3,000.00 School Federal Funds

$200.00 District Federal Funds

$5,000.00 School Federal Funds

$2,000.00 School Federal Funds

$5,000.00 School Federal Funds

$2352.90 General Purpose Fund. $100.00 School Federal Funds

Classroom Schedules

Lesson Plans

Walkthroughs

Minutes from Weekly Grade Level Meetings

Student Portfolios

Student Assessment Results

Bookroom Materials Check-out Report

Library Materials

Check-out Report

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jennifer Jacobson writing PD for teachers Aug. 30-31, Sept. 1 and Sept. 12. Literacy Leader presented running record training for teachers on Sept. 21, 2011. She is working individually with new teachers as needed.

Parents receive Home/School and Early Years literacy newsletters monthly.

No More I’m Done

Books purchased for Jennifer Jacobson training and for book study by Literacy Leader.

10/28/11 – r2 kdg. teachers, three 1st grade teachers, Lieracy Leadeer, & Facilitator attended Reading and Writing with Young Children PD by Peggy Campbell-Rush.

Action Step 1.5

The teachers will differentiate instruction by the use of small groups and leveled books.

PD: The Literacy Coach will provide targeted professional development on differentiating instruction to meet the needs of diverse learners and the use of leveled readers to enhance instruction. The School-Wide Facilitator will inform teachers of district level and state level professional development opportunities.

TECH: Teachers will use the A to Z website, leveled books, and investigate other websites and resources. A bookroom checkout log will be kept up-to-date. Website subscriptions and/or renewals will be kept up-to-date.

PI: Parents will be kept informed about their child’s progress in a timely manner and in a language they understand whenever possible. An interpreter will be provided as needed.

Volunteers will be recruited to help in classrooms.

August 2011-May 2012

(on a daily basis through-out the year)

Principal

School-wide Facilitator

Literacy Coach

PreK-4 Teachers

 

Literacy Materials, e.g. notebooks, pens, markers, etc.

Conferring Notebooks & dividers

Website subscriptions; paper and ink

Substitutes

 

 

STAR Early Lit.

STAR Reading

Check-out system software renewal and labels

 

 

 

Interpreter Extended Contract

$10,000.00

School Federal Funds

BEP Funds

$2,000 School Federal Funds

$5,000.00

School Federal Funds

$3921.50 General Purpose Funds

$3,000.00

School Federal Funds

Burger King Funds

$500.00

School Federal Funds

 

 

 

 

 

$1,000.00

Classroom Schedules

Lesson Plans

Walkthroughs

Minutes from Weekly Grade Level Meetings

Student Portfolios & Conferring Notebooks

Student Assessment Results

Bookroom Materials

Check-out Report

The school has subscriptions to the following websites: Education City, IXL Math, Enchanted Learning, BrainPop and BrainPop, Jr. . Kindergarten has subscription to More Starfall.

Classroom libraries added in k-3 classrooms.

Action

Step 1.6

Students will write daily to improve reading and writing skills across the curriculum, using various writing strategies (such as shared, guided, interactive writing, journals, opinions, writing prompts, and in response to reading.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PD: Teachers will be provided professional development by a writing consultant

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PI/CI: A "Literacy Night" will be offered for parents.

August 2011- May 2012 (monitored quarterly)

July 2011-March 2012

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sept. 2011

Principal

Literacy Coach

School-wide Facilitator

PreK-4 Teachers

 

Literacy Coach(es)

 

School-wide Facilitator

Writing Supplies

(journals, student friendly dictionaries, desktop word walls, bookbinding kits)

 

Writing Consultant

 

substitutes

 

 

 

 

$5000.00

School Federal Funds (Materials/

Supplies)

BEP Funds

Riverside GP Funds

 

 

 

 

 

 

$10,200(consultant Fee) School Federal Funds

$3,000.00

 

$3000.00 (subs)

School Federal Funds

 

$3000.00 (PI)

School Federal Funds

 

 

 

Lesson Plans

Student Portfolios

Displayed Student

Work

Writing rubrics

Walkthroughs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Writing consultant, Jennifer Jacobson, has presented PD for teachers on Aug. 30-31, Sept. 1 and Sept. 12.

Student work is displayed in the classrooms and in hallways. 20 grosses of misprinted pencils ordered for students to use in daily writing assignments.

Action Step 1.7

Teachers will use the Tennessee State Standards and TCAP objectives to guide instruction and will begin implementing core standards.

PD: Teachers will work collaboratively in pacing and aligning of standards. The school will provide the teachers with instructional support in the pacing and aligning of standards. The Literacy Coach will provide instructional support to teachers in using Tennessee State Standards to drive instruction. The School-wide Facilitator will inform teachers of district level and state level professional development opportunities and will assist in allowing release time for collaboration among grade levels.

COMM: Parents and the community will be informed of the objectives and vocabulary being covered through the school communications (such as classroom/grade level newsletters, school newsletters, principal notes, and the Riverside website). Parents will monitor their child’s progress through student progress reports, report cards, and portfolios.

P/CI: The parents and community will be informed of grade level state standards, vocabulary and TCAP objectives.

July 2011 – May 20012


(use of standards- monitored weekly)

(pacing and aligning of standards-monitored quarterly)

Principal

School-wide Facilitator

Literacy Coach

PeK-4 Teachers


Standards Folders or notebooks and Paper

Substitutes

Refreshments and Materials for Open House/Parent Orientation

Ink and Paper for printing State Standards and TCAP objectives

$1000.00 School Federal Funds

$3,000.00 School Federal Funds

 

$500.00 School Federal Funds

$2,000.00 School Federal Funds

Lesson Plans

Walkthroughs

Minutes from Weekly Grade Level Meetings

Student Portfolios

Student Assessment Results

Standards Folder

Newsletters

Teacher lesson plans align with state standards. Skills and standards are indicated in lesson plans. Minutes from weekly grade level meetings on file with facilitator. Classroom teachers each have a standards notebook.

Action Step 1.8

Four teachers will be used for a tutoring program for at-risk students.

COMM: The classroom teachers, School-Wide Facilitator, and the tutors will work together to identify students and their academic focus.

P/CI: The pull-out tutors will provide parents notice of their child’s participation in the program.

August 2011 – May 2012

Principal

School-wide Facilitator

Literacy Coach

tutors

K-4 Teachers

 

 

 

 

Coordination Folders and Paper

 

 

 

Teacher Salaries

 

 

 

 

$300.00 School Federal Funds

 

 

 

$200,000.00 School Federal Funds

Classroom Schedules

Lesson Plans

Walkthroughs

Minutes from Weekly Grade Level Meetings

Student Portfolios

Student Assessment Results

Tutoring Program Schedule


Coordination Sheets

Due to funding only 3 teachers are available for tutoring at-risk students. Parents are notified of students’ participation in a pull-out setting.

Tutoring teachers have daily lesson plans in plan book. Tutoring program teachers’ schedule on file with facilitator and on file in Federal Programs office. Each 9 wks and mid-nine weeks coordination between pull-out tutors and classroom teaches on file with facilitator. Student Portfolios on file with classroom teachers and monitored by administrators.

Action Step 1.9

An assistant(s) and/or teacher will be used to coordinate and facilitate the networked programs in the computer lab.

PD: Classroom teachers and assistants will be provided with an overview of the programs and how to coordinate student skills/objectives in order to meet standards.

TECH: An assistant(s)and/or teacher will use network programs to reinforce/supplement the instruction of the classroom teachers. There will be an investigation of network software which may be purchased.

P/CI: The school will assist parents and community in understanding the benefits of the network programs by sponsoring parent workshops.

August 2011 – May 2012

(monitored daily)

Principal

School-wide Facilitator

Literacy Coach

K-4 Teachers

Educational Assistants

Training for

Assistant(s)

Reports Folder and Paper

Laser Printer Toner for Printing Reports

Network Software

 

Refreshments and Materials for Parent Workshop

$300.00

Title II Funds

 

$200.00 School Federal Funds

$1,000.00 School Federal Funds

$25,000.00 School Federal Funds

 

$100.00 School Federal Funds

Classroom Schedules

Lesson Plans

Walkthroughs

Minutes from Weekly Grade Level Meetings

Student Portfolios


Lab Schedule

Title I educational assistant coordinates and helps students in the computer lab.

Lab schedule is on file with the facilitator.

Action Step 1.10

All assistants will be used as part of an in-class model.

PD: The Literacy Coach will provide teachers and educational assistants with targeted professional development on instructional strategies to improve student achievement.

COMM: Teachers will plan daily activities for their educational assistant to conduct with students. The teachers will communicate needs and expectations to the educational assistant through daily/weekly collaboration.

August 2011 – May 2012

monitored weekly

Principal

School-wide Facilitator

Literacy Coach

PreK-4 Teachers

Educational Assistants

Total of 11 Educational Assistant Salaries

$50,000.00 School Federal Title I Funds

(4 Assistants)

$30,000.00 General Purpose Funds

(2 Assistants)

$75,000

Federal Funds

(1 Literacy Coach))

$18,000

Special Education Funds

(1Sp. Ed. Assistant)

$60,000.00 Head Start & State Funds

(4 PreK Assistants)

Classroom Schedules

Lesson Plans

Walkthroughs

Minutes from Weekly Grade Level Meetings

Student Portfolios

Conferring Notebooks

Educational Assistants Schedule

Educational Assistants’ schedules are on file with the Facilitator and in in Federal Programs office. Two regular educational assistants’ schedules on file with facilitator and in school office. They are being used as part of an in class model. Student Portfolios and Conferring Notebooks kept up-to-date by classroom teacher. All assistants’ schedules on file with facilitator and in school office.

Action Step 1.11

Regular education teacher(s) will collaborate with special education teachers, federally funded teachers, assistants, and specialty teachers on a regular basis.

P/CI: Parents will be notified in writing that their child is participating in an inclusion classroom. Inclusion teachers will explain the program at Open House/Parent Orientation.

COMM: Inclusion teachers plan daily to best meet the needs of the inclusion classroom.

August 2011 – May 2012

(monitored daily)

Principal

School-wide Facilitator

Literacy Coach

Special Education Teachers and Special Education Assistants

Participating Classroom Teachers

Inclusion Lesson Plans

Substitutes

$100,000 Sp. Ed. Funding

 

$1,000

School Federal Funds

Classroom Schedules

Lesson Plans

Walkthroughs

Special Education Schedule

Coordination Notebook

 

Special Education inclusion teachers and regular education teachers have some release time for planning. Release time schedule on file with the facilitator. Release time documentation in PD file with facilitator and in Federal Programs office.

Action Step 1.12

Classroom teachers will provide additional instruction to meet the needs of at-risk students.

PD: Classroom teachers will work collaboratively with the School-Wide Facilitator, Literacy Coach, Specialty Teachers, Special Education Teachers, ELL Teachers, and Speech Pathologist to implement strategies and interventions to improve achievement of at-risk students. The Literacy Leader will provide teachers with professional development on meeting the needs of diverse learners. The School-Wide Facilitator will inform teachers of district level and state level professional development opportunities.

COMM: In collaboration, the classroom teachers will receive additional strategies and resources to use with at-risk students.

TECH: The students will use web-based resources and school-networked resources for instruction, reinforcement, and enrichment of Reading, Language, and Writing skills and strategies.

August 2011 – May 2021

(monitored quarterly)

Principal

School-wide Facilitator

Literacy Leader

 

PreK-4 Teachers

 

 

 

 

 

 

Substitutes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Professional Development

 

 

$3,000.00

School Federal Funds

 

 

 

 

$5,000.00 School Federal Funds

Classroom Schedules

Lesson Plans

Minutes from Weekly Grade Level Meetings

Student Portfolios

Student Assessment Results

Plan of Action by Grade Level

Literacy Leader provides teachers with PD on ways to meet the needs of the diverse learner. PD schedule on file with Literacy Leader.

Use of Promethean boards enhance web-based resources and school-networked resources for instruction, reinforcement, and enrichment to meet needs of all students. Teachers have received both literacy and Math Professional Development from Jennifer Jacobson, Betty Evers, Catherine Kuhns, Stephanie Noland, and Peggy Campbell-Rush, along with PD by Literacy Leader including classroom and school visits. All PD documentation on file with Facilitator and in Federal Programs office.

Action Step 1.13

At-risk students will attend before/after school, fall/spring intercession and summer tutoring programs provided by the school.

COMM: Classroom teachers and pull-out tutoring teachers will work together to identify students and the academic focus of the tutoring program.

P/CI: The extended contract tutoring teachers will provide parents notice of their child’s eligibility for the program. The tutoring teachers will provide parents and community with a schedule of session opportunities. The parents and community will assist the school by ensuring their child’s participation in the program.

September 2011 – June 2012

(monitored each semester)

Principal

School-Wide Facilitator

Literacy Leader

Extended Contract Teachers

K-4 Teachers

(6) 70hr. After School

Contracts

(6) 108 hr Summer School Contracts,

(2) Supplemental

Contracts

(4) Ed. Asst. summer contracts

(2) County Contracts

(1) ELLCounty Contract

(2) ELL Grant

Teachers

 

$10,500.00 School Federal Funds

$16,200.00 School Federal Funds

$3500.00 School Federal Funds

$4400.00 School Federal Funds

$4200 GP Funds

$2400 GP Funds

ELL Grant @ $20 per hr.

 

 

Extended Contract Schedules

Lesson Plans

Minutes from Weekly Grade Level Meetings

Student Portfolios

Student Assessment Results

Tutoring Session Attendance

First semester – 3 teachers (Kristie Cheek, Carol Andrews, Holly Howell) have extended contracts for before or after school tutoring. Two teachers have ELL contracts for afterschool turtoring.

Action Step 1.14

Teachers will use graphic organizers across the curriculum.

PD: Teachers will work collaboratively on instructional strategies for implementing graphic organizers. The school will provide Riverside teachers with training and materials for the use of graphic organizers across the curriculum.

August 2010 – May 2011

(monitored quarterly)

Principal

School-Wide Facilitator

Literacy Coach

Tutors

PreK-4 Teachers

Training

Graphic Organizer Materials

 

 

substitutes

No additional cost for training

 

 

$750.00

School Federal Funds

$3,000.00

School Federal Funds

Lesson Plans

Student Portfolios

Displayed Student

Work

Walkthroughs

Graphic organizers are evidenced in lesson plans and display of student work in rooms and hallways.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

GOAL 2 – Action Plan Development

Template 4.1 (Rubric Indicator 4.1) Revised DATE: __________________________

Section A –Describe your goal and identify which need(s) it addresses. (Remember that your previous components identified the strengths and challenges/needs.)

Goal

·1 The percentage of students scoring Proficient/Advanced in Math will increase as follows to meet or exceed NCLB benchmarks:

All Students- 5% by 2012

African American- 6% by 2012

Hispanic- 6% by 2012

Economically Disadvantaged- 5% by 2012

Students with Disabilities- 5% by 2012

·4 The percentage of students in each subgroup and overall for Reading/Language and Math will increase 5% from the Proficient to the Advanced performance level by 2012.

Which need(s) does this Goal address?

Based on TCAP 2007 scores, Riverside students were able to meet the Proficient/Advanced levels in Math subtests with the exception of students with disabilities. All students must continue to meet these benchmarks.

How is this Goal linked to the system’s Five-Year Plan?

TSCPP, adopted by the MCBOE as its 5-year Strategic Plan, states that all students will meet or exceed NCLB benchmarks. This aligns with the SBOE Master Plan.

ACTION STEPS – Template 4.2 (Rubric Indicator 4.2)

IMPLEMENTATION PLAN – Template 4.3 (Rubric Indicator 4.3)

Section C – For each of the Action Steps you list, give timeline, person(s) responsible, projected cost(s)/required resources, funding sources, evaluation strategy and performance results/outcomes. (For Evaluation Strategy, define how you will evaluate the action step.)

Timeline

Person(s) Responsible

Required Resources

Projected Cost(s) & Funding Sources

Evaluation Strategy

Performance Results / Outcomes

Action Step 2.1

Teachers will utilize networked and web based programs (Math Facts in a Flash, Accelerated Math, etc.).

TECH, PD: Training for teachers in the implementation of computer generated programs.

COMM: Mentors will be used, as needed, for additional assistance.

PI: Parents’ Math Night

Aug., 2011 – May, 2012

Principal

School-Wide Facilitator

Grades PreK-4

teachers

Math tutor

Subscription to EducationCity

IXL Math

 

 

Substitutes

AM Service Contract

Refreshments

 

$1500.00

GP Funds

 

 

 

 

School Federal Funds

$ 2500.00

$600.00

School Federal Funds

$249.00 Burger King & Gen. Purpose Funds

 

 

$500

School Federal Funds

Lesson Plans

Walkthroughs

Accelerated math reports

Minutes from Weekly Grade Level Meetings

IXL Math Report

Math Night Oct. 21, 2011. Report and parent surveys on file with Facilitator and in Federal Programs office. IXL program is being used by all grade levels in the computer and math labs, as well as, in classrooms. Parents were given information on Math Night as how to access this website at home.

Action Step 2.2

Teachers and students will use manipulatives for more hands-on learning.

PD: Grade levels will meet during common planning time to organize ideas and materials for implementing use of manipulatives in the math program.

CI: Teachers will utilize area bank programs for teaching money concepts to all students.

PI: Parent Math Night

July, 2011– May, 2012

Principal

School-Wide Facilitator

PreK-4 teachers

Additional math manipulatives for each grade

 

 

Area bank representatives

$10,000.00 School Federal Funds

 

No additional costs

 

Lesson Plans

Walkthroughs

Minutes from Weekly Grade Level Meetings

Teachers will utilize bank programs to further enhance the instruction of money concepts

More math manipulatives have been placed in classrooms as requested. Facilitator maintains documentation in Materials & Supplies file. Teacher lesson plans indicate use of +manipulatives.

Action Step 2.3

Teachers will use the Tennessee State Standards and TCAP objectives to guide instruction. Teachers will begin implementing core standards.

PD: Teachers will work collaboratively in the pacing and aligning of standards. The school will provide teachers with instructional support in the pacing and aligning of standards. The Literacy Coach will provide instructional support to teachers in using Tennessee State Standards to drive instruction. The School-Wide Facilitator will inform teachers of district level and state level professional development opportunities and will assist in allowing release time for collaboration among grade levels.

COMM: Parents and the community will be informed of the objectives being covered through the school communications (such as classroom newsletters, school newsletters, principal notes, and the Riverside website). Parents will monitor their child’s progress through student progress reports, report cards, and portfolios.

P/CI: The parents and community will be informed of grade level state standards and TCAP objectives.

July 2011 – May 2012

(use of standards-monitored weekly)

(pacing and aligning of standards-monitored quarterly)

Principal

School-Wide Facilitator

Literacy Coach

PreK-4

teachers

Standards Notebooks, dividers and Paper

Substitutes

Refreshments and Materials for Open House/

Parent Orientation

Ink and Paper for printing State Standards and TCAP objectives

$3000.00 School Federal Funds

$3,000.00 School Federal Funds

 

$500.00 School Federal Funds

$2,000.00 School Federal Funds

Lesson Plans

Walkthroughs

Minutes from Weekly Grade Level Meetings

Student Assessment Results

Standards Notebooks

Newsletters

Teacher lesson plans indicate skill and standards that guide their instruction.

All teachers have Standards Notebooks. Minutes from weekly grade level meetings on file with facilitator and principal. A copy of all communications to parents is on file with the facilitator.

Action Step 2.4

Four teachers will be used for a tutoring program for at-risk students.

COMM: The classroom teachers, School-Wide Facilitator, and the tutors will work together to identify students and their academic focus.

P/CI: The tutors will provide parents notice of their child’s participation in the program.

August 2011– May 2012

Principal

School-wide Facilitator

tutors

K-4 Teachers

Coordination Folders and Paper

Teacher Salaries

$300.00 School Federal Funds

$200,000.00 School Federal Funds

Classroom Schedules

Lesson Plans

Walkthroughs

Minutes from Weekly Grade Level Meetings

Student Assessment Results

Tutoring Program Schedule


Coordination Sheets

One federally funded teacher is working with 4th grade math teacher in an inclusion setting during the morning. Afternoon pull-out for grades 2, 3 4.

Due to budget cuts only 3 teachers are federally funded. Parents are notified by tutors when students are pulled out for small group instruction All parents are informed that all students are eligible for title I services.

Action Step 2.5

All assistants will be used as part of an in-class model.

PD: The School-wide Facilitator will provide the educational assistants with targeted professional development on instructional strategies to improve student achievement.

COMM: Teachers will plan daily activities for their educational assistants to conduct with students. The teachers will communicate needs and expectations to the educational assistants through daily/weekly collaboration.

August 2011 – May 2012

(monitored weekly)

Principal

School-wide Facilitator

PreK-4 Teachers

Educational Assistants

Total of 11 Educational Assistant Salaries

$50,000.00 School Federal Funds

(4 Assistants)

$60,000

Headstart & State Funds (4 Pre-K Asssitants)

$36,000.00

General Funds

(2 regular Assistants)

$18,000

Special Education Funds

(1 Sp. Ed. Assistant )

Classroom Schedules

Lesson Plans

Walkthroughs

Coordination Notebooks

Educational Assistant’s Schedule

Educational assistants are used in classrooms to assist students in both literacy and/or math. Lesson plans are recorded in Educational Assistants’ notebooks.

One educational assistant is used pare of the day to assist students in the math lab. Lab/assistant schedule is on file with the facilitator.

Action Step 2.6

Regular education teachers will collaborate with special education teachers, federally funded teachers, assistants, and specialty teachers on a regular basis.

P/CI: Parents will be notified in writing that their child is participating in an inclusion classroom. Inclusion teachers will explain the program at Open House/Parent Orientation.

COMM: Inclusion teachers plan daily to best meet the needs of the inclusion classroom.

August 2011 – May 2012

(monitored daily)

Principal

School-wide Facilitator

Special Education Teachers and Assistants

Participating Classroom Teachers

Inclusion Lesson Plans

Release Time

substitutes

$100,000 Sp. Ed

Funding

$1,000

School Federal Funds

Classroom Schedules

Lesson Plans

Walkthroughs

Student Assessments

Coordination Notebooks

Sp. Ed. Assistants

Schedules

 

.Release time is provided for regular education teachers and special education inclusion teachers, as well as, federally funded teachers. Release time schedule on file with facilitator.

Action Step 2.7

At-risk students will attend before/after school, fall/spring intercession and summer tutoring programs provided by the school.

COMM: Classroom teachers and extended contract teachers will work together to identify students and the academic focus of the tutoring program.

P/CI: The tutoring teachers will provide parents notice of their child’s eligibility for the program. The tutoring teachers will provide parents and community with a schedule of session opportunities. The parents and community will assist the school by ensuring their child’s participation in the program.

September 2011 – June 2012

(monitored each semester)

Principal

School-Wide Facilitator

Literacy Leader

Extended Contract Teachers

K-4 Teachers

(6) 70 hr. After School Contracts

(6)108 hr. Summer School Contracts, (2) Supplemental Contracts

(4)Ed. Assistants.

Summer Contracts (1)

(2) County contracts

(2) ELL Grant Teachers @ $20 per hr.

 

web-based and school-networked resources

$10,500.00 School Federal Funds

$16,200.00 School Federal Funds

$3500.00 School Federal Funds

$4400.00 School Federal Funds

$4200 GP Funds

$2400 GP Funds

ELL Grant @ $20 per hr.

Extended Contract Schedules

Lesson Plans

 

Student Assessment Results

Tutoring Session Attendance

At risk students I grades 1-4 are given the opportunity to attend before or after school tutoring classes.

Action Step 2.8

Teachers will analyze test scores and compile lists to identify at- risk students and plan interventions.

PD: Teachers will receive professional/release time for planning to meet needs of at-risk students and increase collaboration school-wide and county-wide.

TECH: Refresh teachers on use of websites for data analysis throughout the year to implement technology in increasing TCAP scores by 2012. Training will include special education websites, desegregation of test scores, and additional teacher needs.

PI: Parents will be informed of their child’s progress and given an explanation of how they can work with their child at home.

Aug. 2011- May 2012 Principal

School-wide Facilitator

Pre K-4

Teachers

Cara Skaggs

RVAS

 

Assessment notebooks and materials

Substitutes

Ink and Paper for Printing Assessment Results

Computer lab

Discovery Education Math Tests Grades K-4

$500.00

School Federal Funds

$4000.00

Title II and Federal Funds

 

$3,000.00 School Federal Funds

GP Funds for Discovery Ed. Tests

Prepared lists of at-risk students, interventions aligned by subject and grade level

Lesson Plans

Walkthroughs

Minutes from Weekly Grade Level Meetings

Student Assessments

Aug. 2011 – Teachers complied lists of at-risk students using TCAP, Math PreTest, and teacher-made tests to identify at-risk students to receive extra help from Title I tutors.

Sept. 2011 – teachers compiled Data Reflection lists to identify at-risk students and plan interventions. These forms are on file with the Facilitator and in Federal Programs Office.

Action Step 2.9

Teachers will integrate literature into the math curriculum.

PD: The school, the Literacy Coach, and the Title Facilitator will provide targeted professional development on utilizing literature during math instruction. Teachers will work collaboratively in developing and sharing instructional strategies for the instructional use of math literature. The School-wide Facilitator will inform teachers of district level and state level professional development opportunities.

Aug/Oct 2011 (PD)

Oct 2011 – May 2012 (Implementstrategies)

Principal

School-Wide Facilitator

Literacy Coach

All Teachers/ Assistants

Math Literature for the classrooms and the bookroom

(e.g. Marilyn Burns)

Professional Development

Substitutes

$10,000.00 School Federal Funds

$5,000.00 School Federal Funds (PD)

$3,000.00 School Federal Funds ( Subs)

Lesson Plans

Walkthroughs

Minutes from Weekly Grade Level Meetings

Student Assessments

Action Step 2.10

Classroom teachers will differentiate instruction to meet the needs of at-risk students.

PD: Classroom teachers will work collaboratively with the School-Wide Facilitator, Specialty Teachers, Special Education Teachers, and ELL Teachers to implement strategies and interventions to improve achievement of at-risk students. The school will provide teachers with professional development such as poverty training on meeting the needs of diverse learners and extend best practices of NCTM.. The School-Wide Facilitator will inform teachers of district level and state level professional development opportunities. Teachers will receive release time for collaboration.

COMM: In collaboration, the classroom teachers will receive additional strategies and resources to use with at-risk students.

TECH: The students will use web-based resources and school-networked resources for instruction, reinforcement, and enrichment of math skills and strategies.

PI/CI: Students, parents, and community leaders will be invited to participate in a Math Night.

 

August 2011 – May 2012

 

 

(monitored quarterly)

Oct 2011

Principal

School-wide Facilitator

 

 

PreK-4 Teachers

Educational Assistants

 

Substitutes

Professional Development

 

$1,000.00

School Federal Funds

$15,000.00 School Federal Funds

$900.00 (PI)

Classroom Schedules

Lesson Plans

Minutes from Weekly Grade Level Meetings

Student Portfolios

Student Assessment Results

Plan of Action per grade level

Classroom schedules on file with office and facilitator.

Sept. 2011 – Data reflection results on file with facilitator and Federal Programs Office.Math PD has sbeen furnished by Catherine Kuhns (Singapore Math Strategies) and by Stephanie Noland (using Manipulatives in the Classroom) 10/21/11. Students have access to web based resources and school-networked such as AM and IXL. Parents, students, and community participated in Math Oct. 18, 2011. Report on file with facilitator and at Federal Programs office along with parent evaluations for the night.

Action

Step 2.11

An assistant(s) will be used to coordinate and facilitate the networked programs in the math lab.

PD: Classroom teachers and assistants will be provided with an overview of the programs and how to coordinate student skills/objectives in order to meet standards.

TECH: An assistant(s) will use network programs to reinforce/supplement the instruction of the classroom teachers. There will be an investigation of network software which may be purchased.

 

P/CI: The school will assist parents and community in understanding the benefits of

networked programs by sponsoring a workshop.

August 2011-May 2012

(monitoreddaily)

Principal

School-wide

Facilitator

K-4 Teachers

Educational Assistants

Training for Assistant(s)

Reports Folder and Paper

Laser Printer Toner for Printing Reports

Network Software

 

 

Refreshments and materials for Parent Workshop

$300.00 title II Funds

$200.00 School Federal Funds

$1,000.00 School Federal Funds

$35,000 School Federal Funds

 

 

 

 

$200.00 School Federal Funds

Classroom schedules

Lesson Plans

Walkthroughs

Minutes for Weekly

Grade Level Meetings

 

Student Assessments

 

 

 

Parent Workshop Evaluations

One title I educational assistant will be used to coordinate and facilitate networked programs in the math lab. Title I assistant schedule on file with Facilitator and at Central Office. Math lab schedule on file with facilitator and in math lab.

Math Night Oct. 18, 2011 – Computer lab open with students demonstrating math programs for parents.

Component 5 – The School Improvement Plan and Process Evaluation

 

TEMPLATE 5.1: Process Evaluation

The following summary questions are related to Process. They are designed as a culminating activity for you to analyze the process used to develop the school improvement plan.

TEMPLATE 5.1: Process Evaluation

(Rubric Indicator 5.1)

Evidence of Collaborative Process – Narrative response required
What evidence do we have that shows that a collaborative process was used throughout the entire planning process?

Committees are composed of all faculty members, as well as some paraprofessionals, parents, students and community representatives. All committees met on a regular basis throughout the planning process, with vertical articulation occurring among committees. Minutes and sign-in sheets from each meeting are on file. Surveys were distributed to staff, parents, community representatives, and students. Survey results are on file.

Evidence of Alignment of Data and Goals – Narrative response required
What evidence do we have that proves alignment between our data and our goals?

From the data collected through the use of assessments, such as TCAP, TCAP Writing Assessments, 4-Sight, ThinkLink, DIBELS, Writing Portfolios, Running Records, ELDA, Phelps, and Brigance, our goals of improving reading, writing, and math are aligned.

GOAL 1: The percentage of students scoring Proficient/Advanced in Reading/Language Plus Writing will increase as follows to meet or exceed NCLB benchmarks:

All Students- 3% by 2009

African American- 5% by 2009

Hispanic- 5% by 2009

Economically Disadvantaged- 3% by 2009

Students with Disabilities- 5% by 2009

TCAP is administered in the spring to 3rd, 4th, and 5th graders. The analysis of test scores identifies strengths and weaknesses of students, as well as compares Riverside students’ scores to county and state scores. At-risk students are then identified and qualify for extra help in reading and math.

4-Sight Predictive Benchmark Assessment is given four times a year to grades three through five. This assessment mimics TCAP and allows Riverside to predict student scores on the TCAP while identifying students’ strengths and weaknesses.

Think Link is administered two or three times per year in grades two through five. The scores are used to pinpoint weaknesses in reading and math.

DIBELS is administered three times per year in kindergarten and 1st grade. Students’ progress is monitored to check that reading achievement is improving.

Running Records for literacy are used in kindergarten through second grade. The running records allow the teachers to record the students’ reading behaviors and identify the students’ instructional level for reading.

The Phelps Kindergarten Readiness Scale is administered to all entering kindergarten students and assesses their academic readiness. It is also identifies at-risk students to be served in the Title I Program.

Brigance Preschool Screen # II 4-Year Assessment is given to preschool students in August and in May. It provides a sampling of students’ language, motor, social-emotional, and early learning skills, as well as identifies developmental delays, such as in the language, learning, or cognitive areas.

GOAL 2: The 3-Yr Average for the fifth Grade Writing Assessment will increase from 3.8 to 3.9 by 2009.

TCAP Writing Assessment is given to fifth graders in February. This is the initial state-wide writing skills assessment.

A Writing Portfolio is kept on each student in kindergarten through second grade. It contains a sampling of the student’s work with additional work being added each month. Concrete examples of the students’ progress are provided to both parents and teachers.

GOAL 3: The percentage of students scoring Proficient/Advanced in Math will increase as follows to meet or exceed NCLB benchmarks:

Students with Disabilities- 5% by 2009

TCAP is administered in the spring to third through fifth graders. The analysis of test scores identifies strengths and weaknesses of students, as well as compares Riverside students’ scores to county and state scores. This identifies at-risk students and qualifies them for extra help in reading and math.

4-Sight Predictive Benchmark Assessment is given four times a year to grades three through five. This assessment mimics TCAP and allows Riverside to predict student scores on the TCAP while identifying student’s strengths and weaknesses.

Think Link is administered two or three times per year in grades two through five. The scores are used to pinpoint weaknesses in reading and math.

GOAL 4: The percentage of students in each subgroup and overall for Reading/Language Plus Writing and Math will increase 5% from the Proficient to the Advanced performance level by 2009.

TCAP is administered in the spring to third through fifth graders. The analysis of test scores identifies strengths and weaknesses of students, as well as compares Riverside students’ scores to county and state scores. This identifies at-risk students and qualifies them for extra help in reading and math.

4-Sight Predictive Benchmark Assessment is given four times a year to grades three through five. This assessment mimics TCAP and allows Riverside to predict student scores on the TCAP while identifying student’s strengths and weaknesses.

Think Link is administered two or three times per year in grades two through five. The scores are used to pinpoint weaknesses in reading and math.

TCAP Writing Assessment is given to fifth graders in February. This is the initial state-wide writing skills assessment.

 

 

Evidence of Communication with All Stakeholders – Narrative response required
What evidence do we have of our communication of the TSIPP to all stakeholders?

Riverside’s Vision and Mission statement are posted throughout the building and on the school’s website. The school plan is presented to parents at Parent Orientation at the beginning of each school year. Surveys involving components of TSIPP are sent to parents, community representatives, faculty and students, the results of which are kept on file. Copies of the plan are located in our school library and office. The Leadership Team will meet at least once during each nine week grading period to monitor our plan and take steps to adjust and improve our TSIPP. Parents and community stakeholders are continually informed through newspaper articles and school newsletters.

Evidence of Alignment of Beliefs, Shared Vision, and Mission with Goals – Narrative response required
What evidence do we have that shows our beliefs, shared vision and mission in Component 2 align with our goals in Component 4?

Riverside’s vision, mission, and beliefs reflect the determination of the school staff to involve all stakeholders in raising academic performance of all students to levels of proficiency or beyond. To achieve these goals requires careful analysis of available data and use of that data to create meaningful instructional experiences to meet individual student needs while maintaining a nurturing environment.

Goals and Action Plans reflect these shared ideals.

GOAL 1, regarding increasing proficiency levels in Reading/Language Plus Writing is addressed in Belief 1 which states our chief priority is to ensure that all students will master appropriate academic skills through different methods and educational experiences; Belief 2 which addresses standards-based assessment of student performance in core academic areas to indicate the teaching strategies that will best enable all students to attain or exceed state and local proficiency standards; and Belief 4 which relates to frequent, clearly-defined communication among staff, parents, students, and our community is vital to the decision-making process and to the academic and social development of our students.

Goal 2, addressing increasing 3-year average for the fifth Grade Writing Assessment aligns with Belief 1 which states our chief priority is to ensure that all students will master appropriate academic skills through different methods and educational experiences; Belief 2 which addresses standards-based assessment of student performance in core academic areas to indicate the teaching strategies that will best enable all students to attain or exceed state and local proficiency standards; Belief 3 which defines school policies and procedures that provide a safe, supportive, and orderly instructional environment that encourages the self-reliance, self-respect, and self-discipline necessary for optimal student growth; Belief 4 which relates to frequent, clearly-defined communication among staff, parents, students, and our community is vital to the decision-making process and to the academic and social development of our students; and Belief 5 which emphasizes that our school is an inviting and nurturing place for all students to develop into productive citizens.

Goal 3, concerning increasing Math proficiency levels is addressed in Belief 1 which states our chief priority is to ensure that all students will master appropriate academic skills through different methods and educational experiences; Belief 2 which addresses standards-based assessment of student performance in core academic areas to indicate the teaching strategies that will best enable all students to attain or exceed state and local proficiency standards; Belief 3 which defines school policies and procedures that provide a safe, supportive, and orderly instructional environment that encourages the self-reliance, self-respect, and self-discipline necessary for optimal student growth; Belief 4 which relates to frequent, clearly-defined communication among staff, parents, students, and our community is vital to the decision-making process and to the academic and social development of our students; and Belief 5 which emphasizes that our school is an inviting and nurturing place for all students to develop into productive citizens.

Goal 4, involving increasing proficiency levels of all subgroups and overall scores as well as increasing 5% of those Proficient to Advanced aligns with Belief 1 which states our chief priority is to ensure that all students will master appropriate academic skills through different methods and educational experiences; Belief 2 which addresses standards-based assessment of student performance in core academic areas to indicate the teaching strategies that will best enable all students to attain or exceed state and local proficiency standards; Belief 3 which defines school policies and procedures that provide a safe, supportive, and orderly instructional environment that encourages the self-reliance, self-respect, and self-discipline necessary for optimal student growth; and Belief 4 which relates to frequent, clearly-defined communication among staff, parents, students, and our community is vital to the decision-making process and to the academic and social development of our students.

.

Evidence of Alignment of Action Steps with Curriculum, Instruction, Assessment and Organization – Narrative response required
What evidence do we have that shows our action steps in Component 4 align with our analyses of the area of curriculum, instruction, assessment and organization in Component 3?

Component 3 stated that based on the 2007 Reading/Language Plus Writing AYP subgroup disaggregation for grades three through five, that the NCLB mandate of 83% Proficient/Advanced was met in the subgroups of All Students, White, African American and Economically Disadvantaged, but without additional increases, would not meet the goal in the future. Component 4 Goal 1 states that the percentage of students scoring Proficient/Advanced in Reading/Language Plus Writing will increase as follows to meet or exceed NCLB benchmarks:

All Students- 3% by 2009

African American-5% by 2009

Hispanic-5% by 2009

Economically Disadvantaged- 3% by 2009

Students with Disabilities- 5% by 2009

Action steps are in place to help ensure we are able to progress toward this goal determined by the needs of our students and the next steps of Component 3. In Action Step 1.1, it was decided that the school will implement TNA Vocabulary using parent calendar sent home monthly with reading, English, math, science, and social studies vocabulary by week, as well as activities to promote use of vocabulary at home. Action Step 1.2 states that teachers will implement use of the TNA Vocabulary, with parent calendars sent home, to ensure collaboration of teachers and parents. Teachers will be trained at weekly faculty meetings in expectations, parents will be made aware of the TNA Vocabulary at Parent Orientation and/or Parent Conferences. Action Step 1.3 states that there will be one-half day analysis of test scores by grade level, Title, and Special Education teachers to compile lists of at-risk students and prepare for interventions of students not at benchmarks after each testing session.

Component 3 stated that based on Writing Assessment and TCAP Reading/Language Plus Writing scores, there has been no increase in writing skills for Riverside Elementary students. Component 4 Goal 2 states that the 3-Yr Average for the 5th Grade Writing Assessment will increase from 3.8 to 3.9 by 2009. Action steps are in place to help ensure we are able to progress toward this goal determined by the needs of our students and the next steps of Component 3. Action Step 2.1 states that Riverside teachers will attend a workshop by Donna Whyte for writing strategies and interventions. Action Step 2.2 stated that Riverside teachers will implement the use of a writing rubric to be used consistently with grades K-1, 2-3, and 4-5, as well as providing students a copy of the rubric and explaining its use. The use of the rubrics will also be explained to parents at Parent Orientation and Parent Teacher conferences. Rubrics will be posted throughout the school. Action Step 2.3 stated that teachers will receive refresher course in suing writing rubrics from our Literacy Leader during their planning time. Action Step 2.4 states that monthly writing prompts will be turned into Carol Andrews and Debbie Groce and scored by a teacher in another grade, following the appropriate rubric.

Component 3 stated that based on TCAP 2007 scores, Riverside students were able to meet Proficient/Advanced levels in Math subtests with the exception of students with disabilities. Component 4 Goal 3 states that the percentage of students scoring Proficient/Advanced in Math will increase as follows to meet or exceed NCLB benchmarks:

Students with Disabilities- 5% by 2009.

Action steps are in place to ensure we are able to progress toward this goal determined by the needs of our students and the next steps of Component 3. In Action Step 3.1, it is stated that Riverside will implement the use of Accelerated Math in the second grade classrooms with ongoing instruction for those teachers by Carolyn Arms. Action Step 3.2 states that Riverside will further implement the use of manipulatives for more hands-on learning of all students, including those with disabilities. Grade levels will meet during their planning time to organize ideas and materials for implementing use of manipulatives in the math program. Action Step 3.3 states the Riverside will utilize the ThinkLink Learning website by setting up Practice Probes for students to complete during each nine week period. Teachers will utilize the computer lab on a regular basis for student completion of Practice Probes. Parents will be furnished with the website and Practice Probe numbers to complete at home with their children for further practice of math skills. Action Step 3.4 states that Riverside will utilize programs from First Farmers and Merchants Bank and Heritage Bank for teaching money concepts to all students.

Component 3 stated that while Riverside Elementary students currently meet the benchmarks, with the exception of one subgroup, teachers must continue to increase the learning of their students in order to continue to meet these benchmarks as the expectations are raised. Component 4 Goal 4 states that the percentage of students in each subgroup and overall for Reading/Language Plus Writing and Math will increase by 5% from the Proficient to the Advanced performance level by 2009. Action steps are in place to help ensure we are able to progress toward this goal determined by the needs of our students and the next steps of Component 3. Action Step 4.1 states that one faculty meeting per month will be used to allow vertical articulation and collaboration for sharing needs, concerns, and successes as well as strategies, and goals that need to be addressed as a PLC, in order to meet our goal of increasing student achievement. Action Step 4.2 stated that technology training will occur four times during the year to implement technology in increasing TCAP scores by 2009.

 

Suggestions for the Process – Narrative response required
What suggestions do we have for improving our planning process?

Riverside faculty and stakeholders have given many hours to developing the TSIPP. These hours have been before and after school, on weekends, and holidays. It is suggested that more time be allocated during in-service days for committees to work on the plan as opposed to working, as before, on personal time. More in-put from parents and community is needed. This may be done by a larger number of surveys, more personal contacts or phone calls. Additional means of communication with stakeholders need to be developed. This may be accomplished by more frequent school newsletters, more information added to the website, and more personal contacts.

TEMPLATE 5.2: Implementation Evaluation

The following summary questions are related to TSIPP Implementation. They are designed as a culminating activity for you to plan the monitoring process that will ensure that the action steps from Component 4 are implemented.

TEMPLATE 5.2: Implementation Evaluation

(Rubric Indicator 5.2)

Evidence of Implementation – Narrative response required
What is our plan to begin implementation of the action steps?

A checklist of the action steps, along with the name of the person/persons responsible for the action step, will be given to the Leadership Team. The Leadership Team will then ensure that each step is being put into action on the beginning date.

The Leadership Team will meet once during each nine weeks grading period and review each action step, making sure that each step is implemented and progressing. An update will then be presented to the faculty for their review during the next faculty meeting following the Leadership Team meeting.

Evidence of the Use of Data – Narrative response required
What is the plan for the use of data?

The following formative assessments will be collected and used to monitor the progress of the plan:

Monthly writing prompts administered in kindergarten through fifth grade starting in September with classroom teachers assessing the writing according to the county and state rubrics. Teachers will conference with students individually to give feedback. Growth will be charted and compared in individual student folders on a monthly basis and will follow through the grades.

DIBELS will be administered three times a year, in August, December, and May. The results will be analyzed to provide information to teachers as to at-risk students, thus, allowing teachers to redirect teaching to help in areas of concern during the time between the three benchmarks of the year. Results will be discussed in grade level meetings in order to modify instruction or provide interventions as needed.

ThinkLink is administered to grades two through five, three to four times during the school year to assess student progress prior to TCAP. Tests are given in August, October, December, and February. Teachers use ThinkLink to predict mastery and proficiency levels in the areas tested. After each test, teachers focus on the non-mastered levels. Data collected allows teachers to adjust teaching to meet individual needs by modifying instruction and implementing interventions. Test results show improvements and difficulties that still may need to be addressed.

4Sight Reading and Math Benchmark tests are given four times a year – September, November, January, and March. These tests are administered to grades three through five to assess student progress prior to TCAP. Teachers use this data to identify weaknesses, and plan future teaching strategies or interventions. The results allow teachers to individualize instruction even more. Training for teachers on the 4Sight results has allowed more specific instruction for children and better planning for teachers. This provides a good prediction of how students will score on TCAP.

TCAP Writing Assessment is given early each February. Prior to this, teachers focus on writing strategies and interventions with students. Writing rubrics are explained and given to students. Individual conferencing is used to improve writing skills. Monthly writing prompts are assessed, based on the rubrics for kindergarten- first grade, second and third grades, and fourth and fifth grades. The literacy coach also assists teachers in evaluating students’ writings.

TCAP is our state mandated assessment. This testing takes place in the spring of each year and is utilized in grades three through five. Tested areas include Reading/Language Arts Plus Writing, Math, Science, and Social Studies. The test identifies strengths and weaknesses of students, as well as comparing Riverside students’ scores to county and state scores.

 

 

TEMPLATE 5.3: Monitoring and Adjusting Evaluation

The following summary questions are related to TSIPP Monitoring and Adjusting. They are designed as a culminating activity for the school to plan the monitoring process that will ensure that the school improvement plan leads to effectively supporting and building capacity for improved student achievement for all students.

TEMPLATE 5.3: Monitoring and Adjusting Evaluation

(Rubric Indicator 5.3)

Evidence of Monitoring Dates – Narrative response required
What are the calendar dates (Nov/Dec and May/June) when the School Leadership Team will meet to sustain the Tennessee School Improvement Planning Process? Identify the person(s) responsible for monitoring and the role they will play in the monitoring process.

The Principal and/or the Leadership Chair will notify the Leadership Team of the time and location of meetings and will place on the agenda any item to be discussed. The Leadership Team will be responsible for monitoring the Action Steps. If any area is not progressing as it should, the Principal will be responsible for seeing that the area is strengthened and put back on track.

Leadership Meeting: Second Monday of the month July – May or called meetings as deemed necessary.

Evidence of a Process for Monitoring Plan – Narrative response required
What will be the process that the School Leadership Team will use to review the analysis of the data from the assessments and determine if adjustments need to be made in our plan?

The School Leadership Team will analyze the annual TCAP/CRT summary to identify individual students who are not proficient in different academic area. This information will also be used to identify instructional areas of school-wide concern, and will help determine appropriate professional development which may be needed. The performance of different subgroups of students will be understood through the desegregation of data. By pinpointing weaknesses in specific subgroups, strategies can be developed and put into place to meet the needs of these students.

The plan for communicating goal attainment will be as follows:

TCAP results are shared with parents during parent/teacher conferences. State and district TCAP results are reported through the local media. Parents are advised of their child’s progress at all times during the school year with regular home-school communications. AYP and TVAAS data will be publicized in the local newspaper and in school newsletters. Through surveys and meetings, stakeholders will be asked for input concerning the strategies of the action plan and the effectiveness of the TSIPP.

As part of the monitoring procedures for the TSIPP, a focus will be placed on identifying continuing challenges, and monitoring and adjusting interventions and strategies for those goals that are not being met and celebrating successes of goals that are met or exceeded. To that extent, the following strategies or options will be implemented:

·1 July 21-23, July 26, 2010 – Professional development opportunities will be provided to all faculty members, focusing on literacy and/or math.

·2 July 09– May, 2010 Professional development will be provided to all faculty members with a focus on writing by Writing Consultant Dr. Bobbie Solley.

·3 July 2010 – July 2011 – We will evaluate student TCAP data and develop remediation/enrichment activities that target areas of concern.

·4 May 2010 –May 2011 – We will compare and contrast data for DIBELS to determine student progress. ( May, Aug., Dec. 2008 and May, 2009)

·5 August 2010 – May 2010 – The Leadership Team will review the Action Plan to evaluate the strategies and interventions monthly to determine their effectiveness and revise as necessary.

·6 Celebrations for successes will take place quarterly at school-wide assemblies and Parent meetings where stakeholders will be informed of progress toward goal attainment.

·7 August 2010 – May 2011 - The Think Link Assessment will be monitored for student progress toward tested skills. Teachers will use this information to adjust teaching strategies.

·8 May 2010 - We will analyze Writing Assessment scores of 5th graders to determine proficiency rates and compare growth scores using 2009 data.

·9 August 2007- The Leadership Team will review the TSIPP using scores and comments from the state readers.

·10 August 2010 – May 2011 on-site technology training will be provided to all faculty members.

·11 August 2009 – May 2010 – The 4Sight Assessment will be monitored for student progress toward tested skills. Teachers will use this information to adjust teaching strategies and interventions.

·12 August 2010 – May 2011 – The Phelps Kindergarten Readiness Scale will be used in August for all kindergarten students to identify those at-risk students who will qualify for Title services. In April, the Title students are re-tested to evaluate their improvement.

 

Evidence of a Process for Adjusting Plan – Narrative response required
What will be the process that the School Leadership Team will use for adjusting our plan (person(s) responsible, timeline, actions steps, resources, evaluation strategies) when needed?

The Leadership Team will monitor the action steps monthly and identify any adjustments that need to be made in the action steps. Formative data will be used to make informed decisions about which action steps need to be reevaluated. Use of feedback from stakeholders will also be used to see what adjustments may need to be made to any action step. After the Leadership Team has identified any adjustments that need to be made, the entire staff will be included in the decision making process to decide what further adjustments need to be made. Any changes in the actions steps will also be communicated to the stakeholders.

Evidence of a Plan for Communicating to All Stakeholders – Narrative response required
How will the School Leadership Team communicate success/adjustments of the plan to stakeholders and solicit ongoing input from stakeholders?

Copies of Riverside’s TSIPP will be placed in the library and the office. Parents and community will be made aware of the TSIPP in school newsletters and in monthly school news articles in The Daily Herald. Stakeholders will be able to view the TSIPP on the school’s website. The plan will also be presented to parents and community during parent meetings. Stakeholders will be asked for feedback on the plan. The Leadership Team will implement the action plan and monitor the progress during each nine week grading period. An update will be presented to the faculty during monthly faculty meetings and grade level meetings.