Reading Mentor Texts

                       


 

"Picture books are a great tool to explicitly teach comprehension strategies. They tend to be short and are effective models for teaching various comprehension strategies. They can be used as springboards for class discussions or as the foundation for a think-aloud."

- Jennifer Allen

 

Click on each strategy to find out more.

Some picture books to teach Making Connections strategy:

     

          

          

 

Click here for printable book list for this strategy.

Some picture books to teach Visualization strategy:

         

        

    

Click here for printable book list for this strategy.

Some picture books to teach Important Ideas strategy:

         

    

Click here for printable book list for this strategy.

Some picture books to teach Asking Questions strategy:

         

          

        

Click here for printable book list for this strategy.

Some picture books to teach Drawing Inferences strategy:

       

           

 

Click here for printable book list for this strategy.

Some picture books to teach Synthesizing strategy:

       

           

        

        

Click here for printable book list for this strategy.

Making Connections:
  • Activating Background Knowledge - personal history, all you have read or seen, experiences of your day-to-day life.
  • Text to Self - reminds you of something from your own life
  • Text to Text - reminds you of something else you have read or seen
  • Text to World - reminds you of something in the broader world
Visualization:
  • Creation in your mind of sensory images - pictures, smells, tastes, sounds, feelings
  • The cinema unfolding in your mind
Important Ideas:
  • Know why you are reading
  • Look for new facts
  • Seek answers to questions
  • Awareness of titles, bold headings, pictures with captions, quotations, timelines, graphs, and maps
Asking Questions:
  • Helps the reader clarify ideas and deepen understanding
  • "I wonder..."
  • "Why?"
  • "What does this mean?"
  • "That was a great question. Do you have any more?"
  • "Your question made me think of another question..."
  • "How come...?"
Drawing Inferences:
  • Elaborate upon what you read
  • Draw conclusions
  • Reading between the lines
  • Form a best guess about what the "evidence" means; speculating about what's to come; drawing conclusions about what was read to deepen meaning
  • "I predict..."
  • "I think that..."
  • "My guess is..."
  • "That's just what I thought..."
  • "Now, this is a surprise..."
  • "My conclusion here is..."
Synthesizing:
  • Adding your own thinking to what is important
  • What does it all mean to me?
  • Pick out big details and respond to the story
  • Notice your changing thoughts
  • Your thinking and background knowledge added to the summary

 

This site was last updated 12/16/2009.

This site maintained by the Maury County Literacy Coaches.